Tassajara / Sierra .. SSing the Fisher

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It's strange to me that in CA you have to pay for these bikes. Here I have had both just like yours given to me. I scrapped them and put the parts in my bins. I didn't think there was a market for them. About half the bikes given to me are big box store brands but about half are good quality bikes. No one wants old technology here so I only keep a few and scrap the rest. I scrap old Raleigh, Fuji, etc and French road bikes as I already have one of each. I have mountain bikes from early 1980s, early, mid to late 1990s, early, mid and new 2000s. I currently have 10 American cruisers that I kept from 1930s to 1960s, all given to me. I have also given away or sold very cheaply 7 cruisers from 1930s, 40s, 60s and 70s, I get trailer loads of bikes given to me by slum lords that cater to college kids. Everything I want I have so the rest I junk after removing some parts. I give some stuff to the LBS so they can fix bikes for free for the less financially fortunate. I want one or 2 more vintage road bikes and then I will be happy with my collection. I come home to find people have left free bikes leaning on my shop, even in winter. I also have had many donated anonymously piled on my scrap trailer at camp. I am in refusal mode since last winter and even have turned down free 60s cruisers. I get a lot a feelers, "do you want to buy my two really, really old Schwinn Cruisers"? I ask them to send me a photo and they usually are not that old and they want too much for them, sometimes they are not cruisers but city bikes,I pass. Very limited market here, but there are a few vintage collectors and a few that advertise want adds in the local shopper rag. They want pre-war American mens cruisers. They have made a gizilion bikes since day one as bicycling has always been an inexpensive and efficient form of transportation. Once you start looking they are all over the place, there are still a lot of them out there from pretty much the beginning. The old ones are still turning up. There would be a lot more if there were less people like me around but I have no storage room so I keep what I can use to fix others bikes, pass on parts or keep for my collection. Occasionally I buy an old cruiser bike to pass on to other local collectors.
 
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Its amazing to see the different regions value what? Seattle area defiantly MTB country.
We are pretty known for mountain biking but it was loosely organized until about 10 years ago. That might help explain why everyone wants only the latest and greatest. No one wants old technology here. This area is strange in my mind, having come originally from a blue collar poorer community 165 miles away. This area has all the houses kept up as not to be outdone by your neighbor. People like to display their toys, storing their boats and motor homes in their yard. So I think the keeping up with the Jonses attitude effects what people want in bicycles. Only the newest most expensive you can afford will do. They don't want their old bicycles. One of my friends has a fence made out of his old mountain bikes and ones people have given him. No respect for them here, yet. I love them and have kept some of the better preserved ones from each period of their development.
 
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Jul 22, 2009
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Carmichael, CA
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Whether they are old tech and undesirable, it’s still fun (to me) to restore some of them. The Schwinn Sierra has some history with being among the first production “mountain bikes”. I restored it with base/clear paint and upgraded some parts. I dig it, it looks and rides way better now than when I got it.




Justin
 
May 10, 2016
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Whether they are old tech and undesirable, it’s still fun (to me) to restore some of them. The Schwinn Sierra has some history with being among the first production “mountain bikes”. I restored it with base/clear paint and upgraded some parts. I dig it, it looks and rides way better now than when I got it.




Justin
Looks great!! Love the gold bits. Dig that you went one by!
 
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Jul 22, 2009
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Carmichael, CA
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That’s real nice! I’m in the process of SSing the Fisher. People say they’re throw away department store bikes... maybe so for most of the components, but the frame being CroMo with decent geometry is perfect for a moderate build up.


Justin
 
Oct 31, 2017
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NH
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That’s real nice! I’m in the process of SSing the Fisher. People say they’re throw away department store bikes... maybe so for most of the components, but the frame being CroMo with decent geometry is perfect for a moderate build up.


Justin
Gary Fisher is owned by Trek. If you get one of the earlier made-in-USA frames, then you've got yourself a fine quality piece of gear. Same with Treks - If you can get an older lugged-frame Trek, then you've got a real prize.
 
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May 10, 2016
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That’s real nice! I’m in the process of SSing the Fisher. People say they’re throw away department store bikes... maybe so for most of the components, but the frame being CroMo with decent geometry is perfect for a moderate build up.


Justin
Dang. I’ve never heard anyone say that about a Fisher. Typically they’re a nicer bike. Even the ones made overseas were definitely not department store. Especially with a manitou fork! SS will make it a fun one to curb hop n bomb around!
 
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Reactions: NoControl
Jul 22, 2009
1,499
267
Carmichael, CA
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I’m not going to restore the Manitou. It’s 1-1/8 threaded. I’m going threadless rigid. Besides, if I spend the $75 to restore the elastomers, it’s still a bulky “suspension” fork that only works somewhat well during fair weather. Too hot, the elastomers melt.. too cold the elastomers are hard as a rock. No thanks.

Here’s is where I’m at. I’ve re-greased the original hubs, so they spin like new again. Picked up a set of used Race Face 175 cranks & 32 ring, a Surly Singulator chain tensioner and a 16t Endless Bike Kick (Butt) Cog. The original sealed bottom bracket was still good to go so I saved some money there. I’m ordering an Origin 8 rigid fork at the end of the week, which will allow me to continue with the build. There’s no need to go with high end components on this build. The Trail Boss Comp tires are pretty cheap considering prices of folding bead & tubeless... like $34 each.











Justin
 
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May 22, 2020
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It's strange to me that in CA you have to pay for these bikes. Here I have had both just like yours given to me. I scrapped them and put the parts in my bins. I didn't think there was a market for them. About half the bikes given to me are big box store brands but about half are good quality bikes. No one wants old technology here so I only keep a few and scrap the rest. I scrap old Raleigh, Fuji, etc and French road bikes as I already have one of each. I have mountain bikes from early 1980s, early, mid to late 1990s, early, mid and new 2000s. I currently have 10 American cruisers that I kept from 1930s to 1960s, all given to me. I have also given away or sold very cheaply 7 cruisers from 1930s, 40s, 60s and 70s, I get trailer loads of bikes given to me by slum lords that cater to college kids. Everything I want I have so the rest I junk after removing some parts. I give some stuff to the LBS so they can fix bikes for free for the less financially fortunate. I want one or 2 more vintage road bikes and then I will be happy with my collection. I come home to find people have left free bikes leaning on my shop, even in winter. I also have had many donated anonymously piled on my scrap trailer at camp. I am in refusal mode since last winter and even have turned down free 60s cruisers. I get a lot a feelers, "do you want to buy my two really, really old Schwinn Cruisers"? I ask them to send me a photo and they usually are not that old and they want too much for them, sometimes they are not cruisers but city bikes,I pass. Very limited market here, but there are a few vintage collectors and a few that advertise want adds in the local shopper rag. They want pre-war American mens cruisers. They have made a gizilion bikes since day one as bicycling has always been an inexpensive and efficient form of transportation. Once you start looking they are all over the place, there are still a lot of them out there from pretty much the beginning. The old ones are still turning up. There would be a lot more if there were less people like me around but I have no storage room so I keep what I can use to fix others bikes, pass on parts or keep for my collection. Occasionally I buy an old cruiser bike to pass on to other local collectors.
Sounds like an amazing collection. Would love to see it!
 
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