“Amore a Prima Vista”

Jan 2, 2017
322
972
50
Cottam, Ontario, Canada
I get to bring out my “Roadie” roots for this WBO. Picked up this vintage Benotto road frame and fork from the ‘Bay this summer. Came straight from it’s hometown of Torino, Italy, manufactured sometime between the ‘30’s and the ‘50’s. It’s really hard to date these Italian classics so I have to base it on the perceived shift configuration. I’m thinking though it is closer to the 1950’s model, from what little info I can garner.
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Jan 2, 2017
322
972
50
Cottam, Ontario, Canada
I get to bring out my “Roadie” roots for this WBO. Picked up this vintage Benotto road frame and fork from the ‘Bay this summer. Came straight from it’s hometown of Torino, Italy, manufactured sometime between the ‘30’s and the ‘50’s. It’s really hard to date these Italian classics so I have to base it on the perceived shift configuration. I’m thinking though it is closer to the 1950’s model, from what little info I can garner.
]


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kingfish254

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Aug 31, 2009
27,767
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Historic Savannah
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We spent part of our Christmas vacation in Torino in December. Great town. Cool starting point.
 
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Mar 26, 2012
8,017
15,792
Maplewood, MN
'Letting the paint stripper cook on the frame'....9 degrees F in the garage. Somehow those two statements are juxtaposed! :bigsmile:

Troy, this build sounds like it's right up your alley!
Roadie + vintage + Troyminator = Cool factor :thumbsup:

Internal cable routing was standard? Wow. :43:
 
Jan 2, 2017
322
972
50
Cottam, Ontario, Canada
'Letting the paint stripper cook on the frame'....9 degrees F in the garage. Somehow those two statements are juxtaposed! :bigsmile:

Troy, this build sounds like it's right up your alley!
Roadie + vintage + Troyminator = Cool factor

Internal cable routing was standard? Wow. :43:
I think it may have been on some bikes. I’ve seen a couple other frames that have internal cable routing from that period. I think it depended a lot on the derailleur set up. The older Cambio Corsa setup was a total manual mechanism with no cabling at all.
The rear drop outs on my frame don’t have the serrations on them to use the Cambio (bummer).
I believe this frame may be one from the early rear cabled derailleur design. What I do know is I need to spread out the rear triangle to fit the 5 speed rear wheel I plan on using. This may have originally been a 3 speed bike.


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Last edited:
Jan 2, 2017
322
972
50
Cottam, Ontario, Canada
What some of my research has uncovered:
“Benotto was founded by Giacinto Benotto, in Torino, Italy, 1931. Like so many Italian bike manufacturers of the era, Benotto himself was a passionate racer and had first hand experience of the competitive world of racing. He knew of the need for high-quality designs.
Giacinto, together with his brother, researched extensively into the development of racing bikes for the future. However, early in 1948, the story of the brand took an unusual turn. Having read about the newly discovered oil in Venezuela, Benotto was keen to travel to South America in order to set up his classic bicycle brand and capitalise on this new found area of wealth.
The Benotto brothers reached port La Guaira in the summer of 1948, along with 200 newly designed Benotto bikes. As they went through customs, Giacinto explained his concept of introducing bikes to Latin America. Despite his best efforts, they weren't convinced. They maintained, 'here in Venezuela we don’t ride bicycles, we drive Cadillacs'. Despite this initial opposition, Giacinto became a successful bicycle pioneer. Benotto developed the first Venezuelan folding bike, the first tandem and a five person bicycle which became famous through television appearances.
Alongside the pioneering business vision of the Benotto brothers, their synonymous brand would also sponsor a series of successful professional cycling teams. 11 World Championship titles have been won by riders of Benotto bicycles, the most most notable winner being Franscesco Moser in San Cristobal, Venezuela, 1977. In addition, Ole Ritter set an hour record on a Benotto bicycle in 1968; 48.653 km in Mexico City.”

I’m pretty sure my frame is an Italian model. Haven’t found a serial number on it yet though.
My favourite line in this is ‘here in Venezuela, we don’t ride bicycles, we drive Cadillacs’...
I’m looking forward to proving those Latin Americans wrong and putting this Benotto on the back of my Cadillac...



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Mar 7, 2013
1,274
2,524
72
Tucson, AZ
For the sheer joy of riding, there's nothing like a road bike; so efficient, so responsive. The fact that it's a rare vintage road bike will make it twice as joyful. I look forward to seeing the finished product.
 
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Nov 22, 2011
3,998
8,834
KS
Hope you spare the hearse of primer...
 
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