1960 Something

Oct 8, 2020
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OK. So I found this in a barn a couple of weeks ago and found this website shortly thereafter and was inspired to do something with this bike. My original intention was to add a derailuer and some mountain bike tires but the rear drop outs wouldn't allow that so I went with the cruiser instead. The bike was originally red with white pinstipes on the fenders. PO has spray painted the greenish blue paint in a very crude manner and then some black paint in random spots. I decided to leave the paint as is because of rust on the frame in several places. I found some nice alloy rims with coaster brake and now waiting on a chain. Still don't know who this bike was made for but the twin top tubes make it unique. I was told by another member that the serial number is a 1960 bike and probably made by Snyder. Thank you for the help. The head badge is covered in paint and I started lightly poliching it with 0000 stell wool but nothing comes thru. After soaking for a few days in Evaporust, the crank, pedals, quill stem, and handle bars look pretty good. I guess the rusty adds character. Anyway, this is where I'm at and considering adding the fenders and chain gaurd back on. So might add some pictures in that configuration for your opinion. Thanks for looking.
 
Apr 1, 2014
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Snyder built, cool project! Though something looks wrong with the front fork or frame. The front wheel seems to close to the down tube.
Maybe P.O. hit a curb too hard?
 
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Dec 12, 2012
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Reminds me of something I have think I know where they got the idea for this frame now .
Twin top tube Van Dessel ...
Also there's a French bike builder called Achielle that makes a coaster brake bike called an Omar
that uses this style frame .
Your Bike is cool would like to find one like it .
And if you want gears why not do an 8 speed internal like I have on this bike .
IMG_1749.JPG
 
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Oct 8, 2020
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Thanks for the compliments. I looked it over again tonite and can't find any kinks in the fork or headtube. Also the front rim had no damage if it was hit hard enough to bend a fork. What do you think about bobbing the rear fender. The fender stays are pretty bent up. Also an 8 speed internal hub? Will that fit between the dropouts?
 
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Oct 8, 2020
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Yeah, I tried to spread the frame but it kept coming back to the original gap. Tried 4 times letting it set overnight, etc. but no results so I gave up.
 
Apr 1, 2014
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It's kind of a bit of a black art. You push the steel apart a wee bit further than the spacing you need, Release, and it springs back some because it wants retain its original shape.

I usually use a car scissors jack. Just experiment you will figure it out.
 
Jan 21, 2009
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That frame is unusual but I've seen a couple of them. They all looked like the head angle was too steep, and probably is. It's possible the frame bent before the fork or rim would have if it bumped into something, because there's no extra support bar like most frames have. But it may have been built that way, and your forks look straight.
This diagram shows angles, notice how the headtube matches the seat tube angle. That's not a requirement, just shows the usual configuration.
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If you don't like the way it handles, one way to change the headtube angle would be to take some of the curve out of the downtube. That will push the bottom of the headtube forward and increase the angle. I would use some 2 x 4's and gently put pressure on the downtube to take some curve out. Check the angles of other cruiser frames to get an idea of where the best ride is. My favorites are the CWC and AMF with very laid back angles.

For a wider rear hub, I've spread open the frame by putting a 2 x4 between the frame up where the tire will sit in the lower stays. I usually had to hammer it in the last couple of inches. That widened the dropouts more than needed, but I would squeeze them together with my hands with the 2 x4 still in there. Then when the 2 x4 came out it was nearly perfect and I did it again little by little until it was the right width for the hub. I had to straighten the dropouts to make sure they were perpendicular to the hub. I did that with an adjustable wrench opened up just enough to slide over the dropout and give it a slight bend.
 
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Yup, I have a tool I made for spreading dropouts that works well. A piece of 3/8" threaded rod with nuts and fender washers that I put between the dropouts and start turning the nuts. I've done several 135mm spreads and usually crank it out to 150mm and let it set for a bit and then undo. Works just fine. On this bike I tried it and it would not stay spread. It always came back to the original spacing. I think it's because the rear stays are tube steel with welded in dropouts. Just not sure. But I'm happy with it.
 
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OK. So I found this in a barn a couple of weeks ago and found this website shortly thereafter and was inspired to do something with this bike. My original intention was to add a derailuer and some mountain bike tires but the rear drop outs wouldn't allow that so I went with the cruiser instead. The bike was originally red with white pinstipes on the fenders. PO has spray painted the greenish blue paint in a very crude manner and then some black paint in random spots. I decided to leave the paint as is because of rust on the frame in several places. I found some nice alloy rims with coaster brake and now waiting on a chain. Still don't know who this bike was made for but the twin top tubes make it unique. I was told by another member that the serial number is a 1960 bike and probably made by Snyder. Thank you for the help. The head badge is covered in paint and I started lightly poliching it with 0000 stell wool but nothing comes thru. After soaking for a few days in Evaporust, the crank, pedals, quill stem, and handle bars look pretty good. I guess the rusty adds character. Anyway, this is where I'm at and considering adding the fenders and chain gaurd back on. So might add some pictures in that configuration for your opinion. Thanks for looking.
I had the 24 inch version of this.
 
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