Absolute Speed World Record Bicycle

Mar 13, 2007
156
75
Amsterdam
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Not mine unfortunately, but owned by:
Fred Rompelberg,
Maastricht, the Netherlands,
eldest professional cyclist in the world,
current holder of the Absolute Speed World Record Cycling
with 268,831 km/h.:

http://www.fredrompelberg.com/
Rider: Fred Rompelberg, Maastricht, The Netherlands;
age 50 (1995), height 6 ft, weight 170 lb;
married, two children;
current holder of 10 various bicycle world records.
Design: Dave Tesch, San Diego, San Marcas CA.
Built by: Dave Tesch, San Diego, San Marcas CA.
Cost: US $ 12,000.-.
Gears: Double reduction gearing,
primary built by Cook Brothers,
70 / 13 teeth - 60 / 15 teeth,
covering 114,2 ft distance with one pedal system rotation
(fourfold of a normal 10-speed gearing).
Wheelbase: 57 in (average of a normal race bike is about 40 in).
Saddle: Leather, manufactured by Brooks.
Brake: Shimano "Cantilever" type on rear wheel only.
Fork: Special Italian racing fork,
designed to provide suspension travel at high speeds.
Steering
dampener: Motorcycle type.
Wheels: Special aluminium rims, - hubs and - spokes;
18 in diameter for lower centre of gravity
(average of a normal race bike is 27 in).
Tires: V-rated motorcycle road racing slicks,
capable for more than 150 mph.
Weight: Total of 43 lb.

Gotta make me one!!
 
May 18, 2008
559
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Blue Mountains, Australia
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The Strasburg Racing-Team assisted in the record for the fastest race cyclist of the world, 1995 the record of Fred Rompelberg was noted in the Guinness Book of Records, record speed: 166.944 mph.
i was wondering why the bike wasnt very aero, till I saw the fairing on the aero car :roll:

I much prefer these guys, doing all the hardwork themselves - just them and a flat piece of road :wink:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V2FgwN_re4
 
Mar 13, 2007
156
75
Amsterdam
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To me it is an inspiring bike, slipstreaming to a worldrecord or not.
I really would like to build something similar, with the seat lowered and more to the back.
Dig that drivetrain, if i could reach a fifth of that speed on a similar contraption...
I posted this for inspirational purposes, not because Fred is my hero.
(not that he is not, it,s still a praiseworthy effort i think)
 
Jun 19, 2007
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He drafts behind a car. And?

It's about seeing how far something can be taken. If you need piles of support to do so, then you need piles of support to do so. The support does not negate the feat, it qualifies it. This guy sets his records by drafting. The guy doing 81 mph sets his by riding in an enclosed bicycle. They're just using different kinds of support. So different I say they're different records.
 
May 8, 2009
178
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Surprise AZ
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I see that bike and I don't see $12k. Any of the excellent fabricators we have in this forum could make that bike for WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYY less money.

Or does that include the helmet, leathers, food & beverages for the rider, the fairing and renting the dragster for the run?
 
Jun 3, 2010
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Maryland
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I can respect that some would rather see a more "authentic" or "earned" record, but let's be honest. How many of us have the brass to actually take the bars of a bicycle going over 150 mph? I certainly wouldn't do it, and I've done some crazy stuff. A motorcycle at about 120 was more than enough for me, thank you. My hands are still trembling from the adrenaline rush.
 
Jun 19, 2007
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6ixty 6ix said:
How many of us have the brass to actually take the bars of a bicycle going over 150 mph?
Not it. I hit 46 mph on a descent the other weekend. I started in on the brakes at around 40 and am confident I could have ended up in the 50-55 range if I didn't poop my shorts. Over three times that would be pretty wild.
 
May 8, 2009
178
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Surprise AZ
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Guess doing it on a billiard smooth surface behind a streamlined fairing and riding on wide motorcycle tires with suspension would give you an added sense of security. Also if the rims and tires are heavy; the faster they spin the more giroscopic effect they produce and the bike is more stable and smooth, you can't compare it to riding downhill conventionally unfaired at 50mph.

"Mile a Minute" Murphy set his record behind a faired train wagon over boards set between train track rails in the beginning of cycling's history. That was risky, a few inches over and your tire would slide on the metal rail.
 
Nov 4, 2010
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2WheelFlyer said:
Guess doing it on a billiard smooth surface behind a streamlined fairing and riding on wide motorcycle tires with suspension would give you an added sense of security. Also if the rims and tires are heavy; the faster they spin the more giroscopic effect they produce and the bike is more stable and smooth, you can't compare it to riding downhill conventionally unfaired at 50mph.

"Mile a Minute" Murphy set his record behind a faired train wagon over boards set between train track rails in the beginning of cycling's history. That was risky, a few inches over and your tire would slide on the metal rail.

Apparently they picked Murphy up on the train RIGHT before he ran out of the wood track that was laid down between the rails.

The previous speed record holder, John Howard is from my home town, Springfield Mo. He rode in 3 Olympics and won the Ironman. I rode with him a few times in the 70s, my Dad used to manage the local bike shop. That is how I got my Schwinn with the shifter on the top tube.
 
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who was the first guy to do that drafting-inside-a-slipstream-car thing?.... wasn't it an American rider, and older fella who was a multi time RAAM winner? It was in the early 90s if memory serves me correct.

I remember reading that he got towed up to a certain speed, then the hitch released and he accelerated from there.

was he Doug Something? EDIT: John Howard... that's who I'm thinking of. Anyone remember him? http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/LSR%20Bike01.htm
 
Mar 4, 2008
2,555
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Shoreline, CT
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Arreaux said:
268,831kmph

is that right?.... :roll:

that almost 170,000 mph....
fyi: many other countries use a comma instead of a decimal point (period) to indicate parts of a whole number. Conversely they use a period to separate the thousands from the hundreds in larger numbers. ie: 12.745,365 instead of 12,745.365
 
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