Brass Monkey (new-old bars)

Apr 22, 2008
558
11
I remember that on the radio! I was more into the punk and new wave stuff like Oingo Boingo and Devo. it fits the attitude of the bike perfectly! picture one of the beasties riding down the street riding this bike, too funny. :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Scott 8)
 
Nov 30, 2006
6,200
1,357
sacramento, ca
collegecyclery.biz
looks good to me better than i can do. oh and your bell is awsome but i asume your issues is the lever is too heavy? i ran into the same issue on the ratty truck with the first arm i tried. i originally wanted to use a really long arm sorta rat fink style but it was way too heavy.
 
Sep 19, 2007
1,675
17
EASTERN CT
That bike came out awesome and those are some good looking mig welds. Nice even bead. Most of the places I've worked use the 75%/25%-co2/argon mix because it's cheaper and is plenty good.

not to be a putz but....
Gas tungsten arc welding
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from GTAW)
Jump to: navigation, search
Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, is an arc welding process that uses a nonconsumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The weld area is protected from atmospheric contamination by a shielding gas (usually an inert gas such as argon), and a filler metal is normally used, though some welds, known as autogenous welds, do not require it. A constant-current welding power supply produces energy which is conducted across the arc through a column of highly ionized gas and metal vapors known as a plasma.

GTAW is most commonly used to weld thin sections of stainless steel and light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and copper alloys. The process grants the operator greater control over the weld than competing procedures such as shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding, allowing for stronger, higher quality welds. However, GTAW is comparatively more complex and difficult to master, and furthermore, it is significantly slower than most other welding techniques. A related process, plasma arc welding, uses a slightly different welding torch to create a more focused welding arc and as a result is often automated.[1]

Check out Hank Youngs (Young Choppers and Hot Rods) 'The Flying Pan'. He tig welded a beautiful copper gas tank on that bike. Way beyond my skills!