Greyhound

Discussion in 'BUILDS' started by Starnger, Nov 18, 2019.

  1. Starnger

    Starnger

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    Hello everyone!
    In June i was coming to Amsterdam for a few days for a graduation show of my former school, and to ride around i bought a light silver Electra Delivery for just 40 euro. The bike was ridable, but the condition was sad, many original parts missing, spray-paint, whole usual set of problems.
    I had a nice idea for it and here is a quick photoshop mock-up for that build. Grh.jpg
    I have already bought the matte paint for it and taken it apart.
    Today i have started with actual work for it by making the wooden parts and starting to create a home-brew springer forks.
    I plan to try to save and refresh the original wheels, since the hubs seem to work fine. For the rest i have few parts lying around, like 346 saddle and matching grips, and for some parts i wish to keep a surprise for you guys :)
    The pictures of the fork are coming (probably tomorrow, now it is late where i am), and the pictures of the wooden plates on the tank and rack are yet to be taken.
     
  2. Phil Fink

    Phil Fink

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    Not sure how common the Greyhound bike name was.
    Greyhound 2x3 Badge 1.jpg Emblem Greyhound 11.jpg Greyhound badge 1.jpg
     
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  3. MattiThundrrr

    MattiThundrrr

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    Is the spring on the front fork the mount for the fender? Pretty cool
     
  4. Starnger

    Starnger

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    Not really. The spring is because the fork i am building is the springer fork :) I have two forks intended for motorcycle solo seat lying around after one of my previous builds. They ended up to be too hard for the saddle, but i believe they will be just good for the fork. I am planning to add the bridge between the legs and integrate fender mounts there. Because the bridge is needed anyway, to synchronize the legs travel, otherwise there will be too much unnecessary torque and tension on the wheel axle.
     
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  5. Starnger

    Starnger

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    So, while preparing the frame for painting at the garage and making wooden panels (forgot the pictures again), i have started to work on the fork.

    First of all i found a piece of profile that seems right to become a crown for my new fork. Marked it and drilled with normal drill first and then with step-drill to match the main tube.
    IMG_4520.JPG
    Here are the donor parts i am going to use. No functional fork got harmed in this experiment. All were broken/bent/damaged.
    IMG_4521.JPG

    Making the rocking parts of the legs out of 22mm tube. Had to be a bit modified to accommodate the bearings.
    IMG_4523.JPG

    Here bearings are sitting inside already. Now, after this pics were taken, i have switched to two bearings per leg, to have more contacting surface and less load on each bearing.
    IMG_4524.JPG

    Using a welding table to position the elements. The fork must clear 80mm fenders.
    IMG_4525.JPG

    Legs are shortened and rocking axle tubes are welded in place.
    IMG_4528.JPG

    The crown parts to accommodate the axles are made. You can also see the springs intended for that fork on this picture.
    IMG_4530.JPG

    Coming steps are: drilling axle holes, bending legs dropouts to be straight (now bent inwards, some racing bike geometry thing i guess), checking the fork geometry, cutting polycarbonate stubs for the legs to take all the friction between legs and crown, making spring mounts and some kind of safety-mechanisms to prevent a crash in case one or both of springs brake (i've been told since those springs are not intended for that purpose they could) and creating a bridge between the legs.
     
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  6. MattiThundrrr

    MattiThundrrr

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  7. Phil Fink

    Phil Fink

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    Will there be a piece, besides the axle and the general tightness of parts, that will prevent the right and left legs & springs from moving in opposite directions, a la “death forks”?
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2019
  8. Starnger

    Starnger

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    They basically will be one moving part, welded together. Kind of like the bridge on your seat stays, where the fender mounting hole is.
     
  9. Starnger

    Starnger

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    Ok, so, some progress with the fork.
    The hinges are done.
    IMG_4560.JPG

    But when assembling and test-fitting it, i found out, that it appears to be too short.
    IMG_4561.JPG

    It would be ok if i won't have to put the bridge and the fender mount. So now i have to extend the legs.
    IMG_4562.JPG

    Luckily i have another donor fork to extend the tubes. And i have already started making the plastic washers to put to the hinges, to avoid the rubbing and scratching between the legs and the crown. Those are my next steps for the build.
     
  10. Dr. Tankenstein

    Dr. Tankenstein

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    Maybe try to find some Oilite Bronze bushings instead of plastic. I’ve found many on eBay for a custom fork I’m designing


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. Starnger

    Starnger

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    Why not plastic?
    From what i know, it is quite durable and does not have a lot of friction. Then it is very easy to cut it on lathe. And possibly it is also won't hurt the paint, what i am unsure of in case of bronze.
    I already have my soft nylon rod and a sketchy version of the bushing, so i unlikely am going to abandon this material, but still i am very interested, in what aspects bronze is superior over nylon in that case? Apart from aesthetic issue and plastics being bad (i don't disagree here and enjoy metal over plastics too).
     
  12. Dr. Tankenstein

    Dr. Tankenstein

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    In that case, give the plastic a go, it may be an easier and equally as good a solution.
    I agree it is much easier to fabricate with plastic/nylon as well.

    Looking forward to seeing your solution!

    Cheers!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  13. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    Oilite is porous and is impregnated with oil. It cuts easy on a lathe, but also splits somewhat easily when drilled.
     
  14. RustyGold

    RustyGold

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    Here is a pair of parts I happen to have laying on my workbench (the thread insert is oilite)...

    IMG_20191209_225943478.jpg

    ...here is the insert itself...the threads are M8 x .35mm, so, like I mentioned, it machines easily...

    IMG_20191209_230019775.jpg
     
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