How to tell if a road bike is worth restoration....


Feb 2, 2014
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A small primer on road bikes!! :)
So there were/are many grades of road bikes, The hierarchy is based on frame material and component quality. Basically, with steel (vintage) road bikes, the lighter, the better. Frame tubing is a good indicator of goodness. We're talkin' Reynolds 531, Columbus, Ishiwata, Tange, True Temper- it's about butted (double or triple)Chromoly steel tubes. Generally speaking, component quality follows frame tubing quality. In other words, if it's a Shimano Dura Ace group, it's a good frame quality too. These bikes weight around 21 pounds and are very efficient riders.
These are old racing bikes.
But there is a new demand for tourers with triple cranks, fenders and low gears. That's my favorite thing, cause I'm an old fart, plus I love the look of these bikes.
Why? Because they roll. Even my sorry ... horsepower output can roll a road bike at 16 MPH for hours.
So, any of you guys that may find a cool old road bike, post it here so we can see what you found. And good luck! :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 
Jul 30, 2014
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Great stuff and timely. Just started looking at road bikes and when I say road bikes I'm referring to lighter bikes, 10 speeds or so and thinner tires. So I found your info very informative and just happened to answer the exact question I had. What makes a quality road bike?

I do own several other bikes which I really enjoy riding around and working on them, but they are 3 speed bikes and a bit heavier. Nothing wrong with them. Love my 70's Raleigh Sports.

I was thinking of adding a road bike to the collection. But , was thinking of replacing the traditional dropdown handlebars with the upright type. I have some neck issues and the more upright I am, the better. Any suggestions on a light road bike that I can start with? Thanks


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Jul 30, 2014
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Let me clarify. I did have a nice Schwinn World Tourist which was stolen about a week ago. So I'm familiar with road bikes, but I was thinking of replacing my stolen bike with an other road bike... just looking for something lighter that I can use for longer rides. Thanks


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Sep 16, 2014
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A small primer on road bikes!! :)
So there were/are many grades of road bikes, The hierarchy is based on frame material and component quality. Basically, with steel (vintage) road bikes, the lighter, the better. Frame tubing is a good indicator of goodness. We're talkin' Reynolds 531, Columbus, Ishiwata, Tange, True Temper- it's about butted (double or triple)Chromoly steel tubes. Generally speaking, component quality follows frame tubing quality. In other words, if it's a Shimano Dura Ace group, it's a good frame quality too. These bikes weight around 21 pounds and are very efficient riders.
These are old racing bikes.
But there is a new demand for tourers with triple cranks, fenders and low gears. That's my favorite thing, cause I'm an old fart, plus I love the look of these bikes.
Why? Because they roll. Even my sorry ... horsepower output can roll a road bike at 16 MPH for hours.
So, any of you guys that may find a cool old road bike, post it here so we can see what you found. And good luck! :thumbsup::thumbsup:
I really agree with the paragraph on tubing. You need to also list as good components are the higher level Sun Tour and Campy derailuiers. Shimano 600 parts are great too. I have some roadbikes with the nicer Sun Tour and Campy parts I wouldn't trade for anything.
 
Jul 30, 2014
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Yes, I have research the above mentioned frame tubing and components. I couldn't agree more. I bought two road bikes...a Schwinn World Sport with chromoly tubing and alloy wheels and more recently a a Miyata 710 with Tange, Chromoly tubing and Suntour components. I'm in the process of converting to upright handle bars. I have neck problems and can't handle the more aggressive down handlebars. Here's a few pics.


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How would a Motobecane Super Mirage and a Schwinn World Voyageur fit in pricewise and desirability? Both have center pull Weinmann brakes but I couldn't ID the rest of the component where they were stored.

Back in 77 they were my dream bikes..

Dang that was a long time ago. Am I really that old?
 
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Apr 20, 2009
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Japanese "Schwinn Approved" "World" series bikes are well made. Motobecane has a strong following, but I don't know much about them. I guess I'm just "a-feared" of French and Italian bearing and bearing race dimension/thread differences. I don't even know if they still have different types.
 
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I think I remember the salesman at the Schwinn shop in Bennington, Vermont telling me the World Voyageur was nearly as good as a Paramount....and I remember paying $225 IIRC. for it used but in mint condition. Unfortunately it is no longer in the same condition after almost 35 years in storage. It's time to get to work on it.

My bro had a powder blue Peugeot bike and I don't remember anything about it being weird to work on, but of course it was too new to actually need to replace anything. He rode that thing all over the northeast, including a trip to Maine at one point.
 
Sep 16, 2014
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I think I remember the salesman at the Schwinn shop in Bennington, Vermont telling me the World Voyageur was nearly as good as a Paramount....and I remember paying $225 IIRC. for it used but in mint condition. Unfortunately it is no longer in the same condition after almost 35 years in storage. It's time to get to work on it.

My bro had a powder blue Peugeot bike and I don't remember anything about it being weird to work on, but of course it was too new to actually need to replace anything. He rode that thing all over the northeast, including a trip to Maine at one point.
The World Voyageur it was an outsource bike made by Panasonic for one year . As I understand it the the brakes and the derailuer were better then what was standard on the Paramont. So yeah it was a good bargain, maybe to good of a bargain.

As far as the French bikes are concern they were a good bike. As long as you treated them gently. Many came with a derlin derailuer (plastic) they were subject to breakage. Most of the weirdness came from the threading on the early bikes. Check with Sheldon Brown to see that. Most were French standard but later production came with the English standard.