Jukadi

Nov 22, 2011
3,816
8,217
KS
I finished the frame. It is now 3 shades of green. I had a little hunter green from painting my trailer so that is what I "touched up" the frame with. Used an old brush I had laying around but if I didn't have one I would have used a broom. Jukadi is all about function, using whatcha got and not bothering to make it look pretty. Next up, put on some old wheels and take it out an the trails and see if it breaks, then finish building the wheels I intend to try and use (assuming it doesn't break).
Quality assurance and field stress testing, I like that.


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I fussed around this afternoon with my front coaster brake idea because it was raining and I couldn't do my planned ride. I have been experimenting on using a torsion spring instead of an extension spring to return the coaster to coast from the brake mode. I wanted to see if I could come up with a cleaner look. I found a coil spring in one of my junk bins and bent some retaining tabs in it. I welded one end of the bent tab into the brake activation arm but the heat weakened the spring and it broke at the weld the first time I tried it. The weld held in the activation arm so I had to drill out the weld. I bent new tabs and put it together again. I used a kids brake lever just for the trial but I need something with a longer pull. I used a flat piece of metal for an outer axle washer that has a nut in it that holds the static end of the torsion spring in place. You can move the flat piece of metal clockwise to adjust the amount of return tension applied by the torsion spring and then tighten the axle nut to keep the amount of tension you set constant. This works well for easy braking, except when you really clamp down hard on the brake. Then the torsion spring binds and won't return so the brake stays on. I think I need a spring with a bigger diameter and with some kind of nylon bushing inside of it. I at least proved that the concept is feasible, but the mechanical fabrication is beyond my abilities and I can't figure out how to make it work. I could spend a lot of time and search for a different spring but I am tired of it. I guess I will go with the screen door type extension spring. Here is what I tried today. Perhaps someone else may be able to take this concept to completion.

Torsion spring with tension adjuster.


Brake lever and concept setup. Works, until you try an "oh no" stop, then the spring binds and won't return.
 
I ditched the torsion spring and welded a tab on the fork for an extension spring. I wanted a tank but couldn't think of a use for one. Someone suggested a hootch stash. Good concept so I changed the idea and used a stainless water bottle from the thrift store for my water container which is held in place with old pedal toe straps. I ball peen hammer pounded the water bottle in so it would fit between the frame bars. If I would have had this idea earlier I could have spaced the bars to fit the bottle better. It's pretty close anyway. One of the next few days I want to adjust the chain and mount a front tire then it will be ready for the test beat.
 
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I now found a way to tribute our freshwater marine heritage as well as our mining heritage. I have a bell for the handlebars but it is for goats, not ships, but I can pretend it is a ships bell. I found a new local brew "November Gale Pale Ale". I will take the picture of the rough water and lighthouse and put it on the seatpost tube to hide the butt weld in this area where the pipes have a slightly different diameter. I will still use the "Widow Maker beer can logo for my head badge. I also have an old Isle Royal badge somewhere in my junk that I want to put on the bike somewhere. I was forced to drink beer to get the cans. I also hand painted F.U.B.A.R. on the top tube, a fitting statement for this build.
 
Yooperman sometimes provides me with Keweenaw barley pop.
I doubt you were forced. :bigboss:
I enjoy most of the Keweenaw brews. All the other local micro brews have too many hops for my taste. The cans have cool folk art pictures on them, which is a nice change. I counted 7 different Keweenaw Brewing Company beers in the store last night when I bought the Pale Ale. I didn't realize they made so many varieties. They now have a seasonal beer.
 
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Apr 1, 2014
3,500
4,281
65
Wisconsin
I gave not seen Keweenaw Brewing Company beers here in WI, heard some guy in IL got in trouble selling Spotted Cow a WI beer there. Is there such a thing as beer only being sold in its home state?:39:
 
Rode the Jukadi around the block and it rides straight, but the acid test will be on narrow single tracks, which is where I am headed now.

Loaded and ready to go to the single track.

Single speed, not the two speed I hope to use. Cross over tires with road ridge. The race I want to use this for is 28 miles and it has road, gravel and single track sections. I plan to haul it up the hills and through the sand dunes. I want to make an old fashioned style cycle cross hauling loop to make it easier to haul on your back.

Builders motto and inspiration phrase

Goat bell from one of my dead hunting dogs that is a tribute to our freshwater marine heritage.

A little added humor (this bike is already a joke).

Dubious seat post battery weld. The single track will soon prove if it's up to the task.
 
OH OH, the seat post broke, but I was trying to brake it. I went up a mile on a a rough abandoned power line that is boulders, rocks, rock washouts and rock shelves the whole way: no problem. I then went down it faster than I dared and it broke. It was OK until I rode it over some bigger boulders than I normally would have and it broke. Got kissed a little by it. It rides very straight! 3 batteries might be better for penetration but the welds and tubing got red hot so I don't know? Nothing else broke but I wonder if it will? I am sure it would be fine for street use but I want to thrash it. Tomorrow I am going to my friends house and use his proper welder. The welds are still connected to both pieces of tubing but I ground away a lot of the weld. I think better penetration is in order.
 
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Apr 1, 2014
3,500
4,281
65
Wisconsin
My welding buddy told me that my weld would have been stronger if I would have ground off the chrome before welding. I figured that with enough heat I would have just burned through the chrome but not so.
Yes, I also understand toxic fumes are released from the plating, so I always grind the plating off the weld area.
 
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