LaidBack - TransWorld Motobike Rat - Patinafication & Details - 85 Years

Nov 22, 2011
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Hauled this farm shed find home in February. It’s been stashed in garage ever since, I’ve been itching to do something with it. So I guess it will be my starting point. Lots of unknowns with it. Thought to be from 1934 or so, at least it’s older than me.
I’ve collected some parts for it. If successful a mix of original, repops, recycled, used and new parts may get it riding again. As of now it’s still stashed away. In the morning I’ll set it free if it’s not raining.
“TransWorld” refers to a transition period of time of ‘33 to ’35 maybe ‘36 or so when the change over from 28” to 26” tires was taking place and one frame size may have been used for either tire size.
My initial goal is to go through it mechanically add some missing components and parts that would bring it back to somewhat original appearance. It won’t be a full blown restoration but more of a ratty survivor restoration, think preservation.


Some motivation and inspiration.
https://images.search.yahoo.com/sea...hone&fr2=p:s,v:i,m:sb-top&ei=UTF-8&n=60&x=wrt
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Nov 22, 2011
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Oldest bike in the build-off so far?
Think your right. Maybe oldest builder as well...us56456713 builder is close.
What's not to like about this build? It's rusty, it's old, it's parts are in need of some care. And that's just the builder! :21:
Cool start to another awesome build, Ed! RaT oN~!
At least I’m not ready for assisted living yet or the “Home”. As I get older I like the “older” stuff.



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Nov 22, 2011
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Shot a few before pics this morning.






The front tire holds air, stem is loose, chain moves and a little OG paint. Front fender is wrong.
My research seemed to show that this bike would have available with 28” or 26” wheels. It has 26” now but the clearance indicates that 28” or 700c would fit easily.


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Nov 22, 2011
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I have a crusty stem that is more appropriate to this bike. I was anxious to see how it fits.
Also have a set of cross-braced bars for it.

It has some original paint left. I’ll do a cleanup before I decide if it stays or gets a redo. Only original once.

Fork tool sketch.



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Nov 22, 2011
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Lots of coolness to this parts collection you have going. And you're moving at 'OddJob speed' on this one! :grin: Shooting for a June 1 completion date? Just kidding! ;)
Too cold for the beagle on the driveway?
If I get this done with enough time left I might try t work the David Bradley hood into a Class #2 anything goes build.
The Beagle wouldn’t stay on the drive, she would be off down the street on a scent.


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Nov 22, 2011
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Going to tweak the fork, test fit some rain gutter fenders and tires/wheels and proceed from there.
Also going to try and duplicate one of the rare and expensive tool box tanks. Originally I was thinking wood but now I have a sheet metal plan evolving. It involves hand tools and hand forming.

We will see down the road.


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Apr 14, 2015
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Your not wasting any time Mr . Flyer
O to be retired wink wink .
This is a great looking vintage bike


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28" wheels came in two sizes.

The English 3 speed size which are huge. They put them on 3 speed bikes for tall people. Used to be you had to be at least 6 feet tall to be a bobby or postperson. The Raleigh Tourist is the most well known version in the states but Raleigh and some other English companies did sell their regular 3 speed bikes with 28" wheels. That size is also used on many bikes in India and throughout Southeast Asia.

Some 700c wheels were labeled as being 28" for the metric-phobiacs.
700 / 25.4 = 27.55" so they got called 28" so as to not get confused with 27" 10 speed sizes. Nowdays 700c is called 29ers for the wider tire bikes.

The newest bike I ever owned with single tube tires was from the 1920s. I once tried a pair of 1970s 700c sewup tires on the original wheels and they fit well diameter wise, but were far too narrow to ride on.
 
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Nov 22, 2011
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Chilly start to morning in the 40’s. I took the fork out of the TransWorld in preparation for straightening. The lower headset bearings fell apart. I had an old JC Higgins girls frame that I used as part of the straightening jig. The rest of it consisted of a couple of 5/16” bolts, nuts, washers and couple of perforated strips. The brute force was supplied by a 6ton bottle jack mounted on a couple 2x4’s with an arc matching bottom bracket OD. A few sequence photos.






I used the donor frame as I didn’t want to screw up the motobike frame if things went South. The couple hours of effort seemed to work OK. Now on to fender fitting.


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Nov 22, 2011
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After straightening the truss fork I turned my attention towards a 28” fender set I got of the CABE if I remember right. They have been painted at some point without much preparation. They are fairly straight with just a few bends and dents. I had gotten a a set of fender braces from the guy back East with all the Columbia parts.
So today my second goal was to see if I could bring the two together for use on the TransWorld Motobike. More pictures...


I will probably trim the front fender and cut off the front brace. The fenders will need some paint or patina added to match the frame.


Not one to leave well enough alone I had to experiment a bit with potential 26” tires.


Another unknown with the fenders, braces and tires relates to clearances. Guess I need to clean up and service the wheelset.

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