STRETCH CRUISER ADVICE NEEDED!!!

Nov 18, 2010
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The long chain can be a challenge to tension while keeping the back wheel centered ,and tightening the rear axle nuts. Consider rear horizontal dropouts that can accommodate the type of chain tensioner that moves the rear axle back, before tightening the axle nuts.
 
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The Renaissance Man

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Thanks @rrtbike, I'm working on a design that will utilize the TRM Convertible Tank.
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I can use either a cartridge bottom bracket or an American bb. Using the American bb gives me the option of using either one piece or three piece cranksets. Does anyone know of any other reason for using one over the other?
 
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cman

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It would be easier to adjust the chainline with a 3 piece crankset, if you run a fat tire out back. A 1-piece shell with a 3 piece BB looks kinda kludgy.
 
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Starnger

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The advantage of the cartridge is that they also exist in 100mm and 120mm width, so, as cman said, you would have a nice clearance if you run wide wheels. American BB advantage is that it is easier to serve, change grease or one bearing for example. And of course it looks old-school awesome, especially with 1 piece crank. 3 piece cranks for American BB are more expensive and slightly stronger then single piece. If you are running narrow wheels i'd go for American BB with nice sealed industrial bearings.
 
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The Renaissance Man

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If for no other reason, I think the American BB wins out just for versatility.

Another thing that I was waiting for someone to mention is the concentric bottom bracket possibility for American. Not sure if it would ever come into play, but at least the option is there.
 
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I have to be truthful, the only reason I haven't given a more serious look to the conversion tanks is because they work with a girl's frame, which would be way too small for me to ride comfortably...but a tretch frame with that tank? I'll be watching...
 
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The Renaissance Man

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I have no way of knowing what geometry will satisfy me, so I have been looking at photos of a few of the popular mass produced stretch bikes to get a basic idea of what has already been done. I've come to the conclusion that there is not any standard configurations to go by, so I made a general guess and am planning to build a 'frankenstretch' just so I can ride and evaluate it before committing to anything more time consuming.

I have a crappy damaged frame that will be cut up and scabbed back together as a test bike very soon. The plan is to cobble together a jig with mounting points that I have predetermined, bolt the pertinent pieces in place and connect the dots. It should be hideous but will serve its intended purpose! As an added bonus it will also serve as a fearless foray into amateur welding!:happy:
 

The Renaissance Man

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Maybe a little help. I use to use 21" from the seat post
clamp to the back of the BB. Then at least 10" from the
front of the BB to the back of the front tire. 30 degrees
on the rake.
Remarkably I checked all of these numbers against my design and they are almost exactly the same! I really appreciate your input, it gives me more confidence going forward!:thumbsup:
 
Sep 18, 2011
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I'm looking for any and all advice about stretch cruisers.

I've been exploring the idea of scratch building one this winter but I have no prior experience with this style bike. If you have ever owned one, built one or even ridden someone else's stretch cruiser, I'm interested in what you have to say about it!

Get one – but not this one – this one is mine.



Technically speaking, these two examples are Dutch Lowglides: The height of the rear tire crown sits higher than the saddle, the lower saddle and peddles sit in between the front and rear wheels (similar to a long wheel base recumbent, BUT A LOT COOLER!) w/the fork ‘kicked-out' at ~32-45-degrees and the handlebar ends at even too, or slightly below the gooseneck crown (but not always).

Custom 2007 Giant Stiletto:
24X3 tires F/R Kenda Krusaders
7-speed 13-34 rear Shimano Mega Range freewheel
42-T 3-piece crank w/an elliptical bottom bracket connected to a jack gear, geared neutral w/2 22t drive cogs

Fork raked at 39-degrees
Front drum brake/rear disk brake
Hand formed raw steel shifter; thus the bike’s name of “Bad Finger”

Pinstriping by Todd Fisher of Volusia County Customs https://www.facebook.com/toddfishervolusiacountycustoms/ Send him your fenders or frames by mail and he’ll get’er done!

Saddle is fiberglass reinforced plastic w/a steel frame, covered in Morgan Horse leather w/memory foam underlay; crazy comfortable!
 
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Mar 8, 2011
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My suggestions to stay with 3" rims or less. This avoids chainline and chain/tire rub issues. If you could send me an email addy, I can send you a dimensioned drawing of a Project 346 Basman, which is one of the most sought after frames. I personally own one along with several other bikes. It will be the last bike I would ever sell. Minimum of 4" of ground clearance so it is truly ridable, w/o dragging issues. Shimano Nexus 3-speed is a very common rear hub. 30 degree head angle is good. Remember, you want to enjoy the ride, not stress the workout from poor handling or excessive weight. Sorry Im all over the place with my thoughts.
 

The Renaissance Man

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My suggestions to stay with 3" rims or less. This avoids chainline and chain/tire rub issues. If you could send me an email addy, I can send you a dimensioned drawing of a Project 346 Basman, which is one of the most sought after frames. I personally own one along with several other bikes. It will be the last bike I would ever sell. Minimum of 4" of ground clearance so it is truly ridable, w/o dragging issues. Shimano Nexus 3-speed is a very common rear hub. 30 degree head angle is good. Remember, you want to enjoy the ride, not stress the workout from poor handling or excessive weight. Sorry Im all over the place with my thoughts.
Thanks! I've been thinking 26"x 80mm rims with a Nexus 3-speed coaster brake hub.

My email is: spacelinertank@gmail.com
 
Feb 27, 2015
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I’ve got a Dyno Roadster, and my suggestion is to do what I did and put a 5-speed hub on it. Like others have said, hills are an issue and you will really want gears.
I do think a backrest would be a good thing, if I can figure one out that doesn’t look wrong.
 

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