The Flying Yard Sale

So I am a bit late to the party. We've had some family stuff that took priority and work as usual. I have some free time now to dedicate to this project and I'm ready to play in this build off for the first time. Pardon the initial photo's - first time, kinda nervous. I basically have parts that I collected over several years ever since the build offs have started. I have always wanted to get into a build off but back then I was in the military and deployed some. Now that I'm retired it's finally time.

I would like to build a military style bicycle. I have always loved the 1940'2 and 50's era. My grandpa (8th Army Air Corps, 100th Bomber Group) used to let us boys ride their balloon bikes around the lake back in the 70's. He was a ground crew sheet metal guy. He used the bikes a lot for parts runs as well as screwing off.

This build I have some inspiration from the board tracker age. I want some fatty's on my ride. I'd also like to work in a bit of apocalyptic theme to the bike as I get some hints from my girls as they are comic fans. I'd also like to show off some people in my town of Colorado Springs who have helped with this project. Those local business bike shop owners and fabrication pro's that are the home grown promoters of what we love.

Frinkin Super Hero this guy!

Apocalyptic war bike. This image was found on the net from a Comic Convention I like the concept - Mad Maxish


Though I really couldn't stand the movie at all, I like the concept of "Bunny."


This is my beginning frame. For the life of me I cannot figure out what type of bicycle it is. I think I am one of many owners of this frame. I wish it had a voice to tell its story. It was traded along with the frame of a Columbia Firebolt plus $100, for a Schwinn Varsity.
My wife thinks I got robbed.
If anyone can help out on what type of frame it is I'd be extremely grateful.

Serial number shot. Notice the two rivet marks on each side of the serial - Monark?

Persons seat - not too shabby. I'm going to put some patina leather on it. This canvas is too brittle to keep.


Strumey Archer Hubs. Yes, this thing is going to be a tank I know.


Old Delta Light

Unknown Rear Light with THICK red glass. With some LED's and a XGEN2 Regulator, I can run both lights off the dynomo

Soon to be "de-chromed" Wald fenders. These are some of the old ones with the reflector holes pre-punched.


This was a weird find. "Ed" at our local bike shop has had these heavy duty fender braces in storage for about 40 years. I placed a regular fender brace under them for proportion. We can't figure out what the original use was for other than the obvious. They are bomb proof.

Last for this post is my rack and pannies. The ammo can is from a Russian PKM. We used to use these in Afghanistan while training the Afghan Army. I did a mock up and don't think they look too bad with a thin profile.

 
[/URL][/IMG] Another bike i'm looking forward to seeing complete. A few things (you're probably already aware of) with regards to that rear hub as I've spent much time with one. Firstly, pull the innards out and soak it in ATF, makes it shift way smoother. Secondly, don't gear it too low. With first gear being the direct drive gear, the lowest gear ratio you will have will be 1st. If you try to achieve a lowest ratio of less than 1:1, the torque will fry one of the planetary gears. Thirdly, take it easy spreading the rear end to slide that baby in there and i'd recommend aligning the dropouts (if you don't have D.O alignment tools your LBS should). Lastly, because of the torque applied to the hub in the first three gears (first planetary set) you'll want to make sure of a good fit between the axle itself and the dropouts. Any twisting of the axle will result in miss timed shifts and you'll be chasing your tail for days to get it to work.
I usually cant be bothered commenting (just want to build bikes and get on with it) but felt compelled.

Good luck!

'30s Roadmaster with SA 8spd. running 23-25 final drive....it worked briefly


The dropouts on this frame were splayed enough for the axle to twist


Even Louie is dubious
 
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Thanks Kev. I purchased a 27 tooth sprocket. We have a lot of hills out here and I figured it would be a good deal. I'm wondering what you think about that for the gearing in regard to what you wrote. The "innards" scare the heck out of me. I'm feel like 007 disarming a nuke - and there is an off switch right in front of me. I'll give it a go. Thanks for the input. I'm all ears.

[/URL][/IMG] Another bike i'm looking forward to seeing complete. A few things (you're probably already aware of) with regards to that rear hub as I've spent much time with one. Firstly, pull the innards out and soak it in ATF, makes it shift way smoother. Secondly, don't gear it too low. With first gear being the direct drive gear, the lowest gear ratio you will have will be 1st. If you try to achieve a lowest ratio of less than 1:1, the torque will fry one of the planetary gears. Thirdly, take it easy spreading the rear end to slide that baby in there and i'd recommend aligning the dropouts (if you don't have D.O alignment tools your LBS should). Lastly, because of the torque applied to the hub in the first three gears (first planetary set) you'll want to make sure of a good fit between the axle itself and the dropouts. Any twisting of the axle will result in miss timed shifts and you'll be chasing your tail for days to get it to work.
I usually cant be bothered commenting (just want to build bikes and get on with it) but felt compelled.

Good luck!

'30s Roadmaster with SA 8spd. running 23-25 final drive....it worked briefly


The dropouts on this frame were splayed enough for the axle to twist


Even Louie is dubious
 
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I got the Persons Seat reupholstered. Dyed the leather a British Tan and then distressed it a bit by scraping it with a razor, sand paper, and set some patina onto it. Finished with a beeswax conditioner. My hope is that I can work the patina evenly across the whole bike so there is not an "over-weathered" piece or "under-weathered."


The use of a yoga mat for padding was a bust as the texture shows through the leather.




 
Dont fear the innards! Get the hub laced into a wheel and mount the tyre. Remove the drum brake (one 17mm nut i believe) and the bearing race. Once done, the entire inside assembly can be unscrewed from the shell. You'll find a notched dark grey ring just next to the hubshell on the drive side which you can unscrew with deft use of a punch on one of the notches. This is way easier with a built wheel as you'll have more leverage. Difficult to explain but you'll figure it out.
 
Dont fear the innards! Get the hub laced into a wheel and mount the tyre. Remove the drum brake (one 17mm nut i believe) and the bearing race. Once done, the entire inside assembly can be unscrewed from the shell. You'll find a notched dark grey ring just next to the hubshell on the drive side which you can unscrew with deft use of a punch on one of the notches. This is way easier with a built wheel as you'll have more leverage. Difficult to explain but you'll figure it out.
Awesome Thanks!!!
 
I got it from a buddy of mine. I did the soak and form fit around the pad so it would snug down but I still have slop that can be tightened up if needed. I build knives so this was a free piece of leather. It feels like a well broke in first base man's glove. How's the skeeters up there, Yooper?

Sent from my SGH-T399 using Tapatalk
 
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