(WBO) SGT. ROCK finished (for now)

Sep 14, 2013
6,197
12,879
59
Bradley Illinoiz
www.instagram.com
GC--way to go on the wheel lacing... Put it in the truing stand ... :headbang:
Lucky I have the rear clip from the mountain bike I cut up to build HeadBanger... I'm also hoping that having a straight hoop to start with helps. My spokes aren't supposed to arrive til Thursday, so you know I'm goin' nuts. Been reading everything I can. Watched the vid Chad posted (Thanks Bro!) Now I'm window shopping hubs for my NEXT build. It's a sickness and thanks to you guys, I got it! o_O Cheers.

Carl.
 
Sep 7, 2014
3,142
6,112
52
Columbus OH
Awesome Carl! You're well on your way. You can use whatever to make a truing stand. Old frame fork etc. Just need something to hold it you can spin the wheel in and have something to get close to the wheel with so you can see any wobbles.

I like to get the up and down motions out of the wheel before I get too carried away on the side-side wobbles.

Tighten the nipples down evenly (like he does in the vid). I usually eyeball the amount of threads then you can eyeball the spoke end coming up through the nipple. It will look all screwed up at first. Only a few of the nipples will be touching the rim. You just have to keep at it tightening them evenly until they all start bottoming out.

I like to soak the nipples in some WD 40 then dry them off with a paper towel. This leaves lube on the threads. This helps to keep the spokes from twisting as you tighten them down.

Lots of little tricks you'll learn along the way. Check out Sheldon Brown's site for great wheel building info as well. http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html
 

The Renaissance Man

__CERTIFIED DIVER__ (Open Water & Open Dumpster)
Nov 24, 2012
7,896
18,679
The Tropics of Alabama
I've got an old frame that I prop up in my vice for a truing stand. I cut a zip tie to a point and slide it around to locate the point where it's needed. It can be adjusted to the edge of the rim by rotating in or out. It also slides back and forth to meet the top edge for checking wheel hop. Pretty simple.

 
Sep 1, 2014
405
279
39
A set of dial indicators make a pretty good crutch if you can get ahold of some cheap and it's pretty easy to get the wheel darn near perfect while using them but there will be a bump where the rim is welded. The indicators are not necessary but it will show your progress and make it easier to find the worst point to start. I have one available so I use it. If your rim is straight things should go well.
GOOD LUCK :grin:
 
Sep 7, 2014
3,142
6,112
52
Columbus OH
Yes beware of the welded seam. I've chased the welded seam wobble before. That can really throw you off. Dial indicator would be a nice accessory but you can get 'em straight with a zip tie.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GuitarlCarl
Mar 5, 2014
1,333
2,395
62
Utah
Great alternative tips for you above. But, if you plan to do wheels a lot, I suggest you invest in a truing stand. They are certainly easier to use. And, you can sit on your couch with the stand and wheel on the LR table! :cool2:
 
Sep 14, 2013
6,197
12,879
59
Bradley Illinoiz
www.instagram.com
Great alternative tips for you above. But, if you plan to do wheels a lot, I suggest you invest in a truing stand. They are certainly easier to use. And, you can sit on your couch with the stand and wheel on the LR table! :cool2:
Dude, I'm a bachelor! I can sit in my living room with a bike if I want... and I do sometimes. My coffee table is an old wooden dining table with the legs cut down. (used to be the Lego table when my kids were young) Lots of room for parts, be they hubs spread apart for cleaning and greasing or guitars tore apart for some rewiring. I've got a vise on a slab of plywood that has sat on my table more than once. I'll probably put that rear clip I have in the vise and set it right on the table!

Carl.
 
Mar 5, 2014
1,333
2,395
62
Utah
Ha! Awesome Carl! I've got bike stuff laying all over the place inside my house too. Significant others are never too happy when the bike parts come into the living space in any form. That said, I do think that if you do decide to invest in one, you will become a wheel-building maniac! I use my stand generally for building from scratch, and use the tried-and-true methods above for quick "true checks". What I do is flip the built bike upside down and spin the wheel while holding a small screwdriver against the rim. I can do small adjustments as effectively as a true stand. But some day you will break down and get one Carl! Keep us posted on the wheel works you have goin on. Have you considered colored alloy nips instead of brass? skpc
 
  • Like
Reactions: GuitarlCarl
Sep 14, 2013
6,197
12,879
59
Bradley Illinoiz
www.instagram.com
Colored nips next time... This will be a military bike, olive green paint is done... black tires, black rims, black spokes, but I'm going for a bit of flash... chrome nips. Triple tree forks coming soon, in black. I need a rear rack, and I'm looking at bobbing some fenders...

Carl.
 
Sep 14, 2013
6,197
12,879
59
Bradley Illinoiz
www.instagram.com

Got the wheels I wanted on my frame, WOOHOO! That og fork isn't staying tho... I'm also going to rub down my flat olive paint with something oily... not sure what yet. Handlebars are just meh... we'll see what ends up on the final. Right now I'm just scratching up some loose change for the forks I want... So for now it's just another mock up...

Carl.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chad T

Members online

BOXKARS Clyde James Cycles