Weird 3d printed fixie.

Jun 13, 2015
941
1,557
43
US occupied MA
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
That looks uncomfortable and I guess it's pretty fragile if he doesn't want people to touch it (the latter is meant as a joke). Cool looking, but not necessarily useable. Reminds me of an ID student project.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant
Aug 14, 2019
701
1,638
62
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I see a headless figure riding itself in that bike. The bars are the arms, the top tube is the back and the seatpost is the legs.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: ferdy and Grant

Starnger

Pro Member
Aug 4, 2016
701
1,434
27
Poznan, Poland
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Thats a cool experiment!
Let those sportbike and fixie guys to produce them, so the technology gets cheaper and we use it to build cruisers in a few years :D
Still looking forward to run that ceramicspeed thing on one of my bikes.
 
Apr 28, 2019
812
1,644
33
Warsaw PL
allejazda.waw.pl
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Thats a cool experiment!
Let those sportbike and fixie guys to produce them, so the technology gets cheaper and we use it to build cruisers in a few years :D
Still looking forward to run that ceramicspeed thing on one of my bikes.
Well that's a plan for sure. ;) Actually 3D printing is cheap. The only problem is the size of the printer needed for the print. A friend of mine has a relatively small 3D printer (like "half of his desk" small :21:), and it only can print objects in dimentions of 20x20x20cm (~8x8x8 inch). He printed me a case for a 7" tablet in the shape of a Pip-Boy 2000 from Fallout for one of my postapocalyptic projects. The cost of a very tough filament used for the printer was about 20PLN (~5$). I still needed to sand the edges, and paint it to get to a more smoother look, but it has a sturdy feeling to it (well he set the detail level of the print to 200% so it would came out sturdy). The problem was the size of the print - we had to glue it from two pieces, and time that it took for the print to be complete - almost 72 hours, and still it's not much bigger than a 7" tablet. Just imagine how many days (or weeks) it would take to print a frame...:43:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant

Starnger

Pro Member
Aug 4, 2016
701
1,434
27
Poznan, Poland
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Well that's a plan for sure. ;) Actually 3D printing is cheap. The only problem is the size of the printer needed for the print. A friend of mine has a relatively small 3D printer (like "half of his desk" small :21:), and it only can print objects in dimentions of 20x20x20cm (~8x8x8 inch). He printed me a case for a 7" tablet in the shape of a Pip-Boy 2000 from Fallout for one of my postapocalyptic projects. The cost of a very tough filament used for the printer was about 20PLN (~5$). I still needed to sand the edges, and paint it to get to a more smoother look, but it has a sturdy feeling to it (well he set the detail level of the print to 200% so it would came out sturdy). The problem was the size of the print - we had to glue it from two pieces, and time that it took for the print to be complete - almost 72 hours, and still it's not much bigger than a 7" tablet. Just imagine how many days (or weeks) it would take to print a frame...:43:
I do have experience with 3d printing too, but exactly what you said, the bigger printers are still expensive and slow. But most importantly, my guess is you won't want to print your frame with PLA plastic. Probably there should be some serious material research before choosing the filament that is strong enough and wear resistant.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant
Apr 28, 2019
812
1,644
33
Warsaw PL
allejazda.waw.pl
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I remember when some people had a "great" idea of building a 3D printer that would print... steel bridges... basically a gigantic, automated welder, using welding wire instead of PLA... I don't have to mention that building a bridge ONLY from welds was not a great idea :21:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grant
Oct 28, 2018
1,486
690
Colorado
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Thats a cool experiment!
Let those sportbike and fixie guys to produce them, so the technology gets cheaper and we use it to build cruisers in a few years :D
Still looking forward to run that ceramicspeed thing on one of my bikes.
What is the CeRaMiCsPeEd thing?
 
Oct 28, 2018
1,486
690
Colorado
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Thats a cool experiment!
Let those sportbike and fixie guys to produce them, so the technology gets cheaper and we use it to build cruisers in a few years :D
Still looking forward to run that ceramicspeed thing on one of my bikes.
Yah! Like this is what we will see in the future.
EG5AzcG.jpg


Or this.
1476100794514.jpg

Or, even this!
t9uv4x.jpg
 
Oct 28, 2018
1,486
690
Colorado
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I heard people say that it would never work. They have it on a bike that is ride able, so why is nobody riding that bike? Old shaft drive bikes work because they are very rugged and are steel. People are saying that the ceramicspeed bike would just break if someone were to ride it.
1_0aad82e243a3ae2437b015d75e073ba4.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: SpikeFC

Starnger

Pro Member
Aug 4, 2016
701
1,434
27
Poznan, Poland
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
I heard people say that it would never work. They have it on a bike that is ride able, so why is nobody riding that bike? Old shaft drive bikes work because they are very rugged and are steel. People are saying that the ceramicspeed bike would just break if someone were to ride it.
View attachment 110107
Well, Ceramicspeed is not just a bunch of random guys, but a company successfully developing and selling fine bicycle components. I'd rather believe a group of designers and engineers, who would not risk a reputation advocating for something of a questionable functionality, then people online who have little actual knowledge on the development process. However, this is not a strong opinion, since many counter-examples have been taking place in past :) At this stage, all i can provide is my hope for a better alternative to personally disliked derailleurs would be found. So let's wait for another year or two and see :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: RustyGold and Grant