Boardtracker / Antique motorcycle style bicycle build

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@OddJob is the patina master. He has a technique with spray paint to simulate rust.

"Spray a few spots of Cinnamon and Dark Taupe where you want rust to be. Cover those spots with mustard so that will wash off with the top coat after it's applied and reveal the 'surreal rust'."

View attachment 175909
View attachment 175908View attachment 175907View attachment 175906
Photo examples are on plastic
That looks really nice. Thanks for the tips Matti.

Currently I am waiting for the frame to arrive. (Ruff Cycles mentioned a shipping time up to 10 days, but its three weeks already?!??). Their customer support is great and told they will be shipping soon, so that will be fine.

The lasercutter for the fork crown plates is the same: 3 days till its ready. Now also 2 weeks waiting.

I don't mind waiting a long time, but when a company advertises with a short delivery time, the expectations will be there as well for many customers.

What are your thoughts on:
  • RAL8001:
RAL8001 frame
  • RAL3005: (Indian colour?)
RAL3005 bike
  • RAL8022: (blackbrown)
  • RAL3007 (blackred)
RAL3007


Still looking for a nice antique-vibe colour. I really enjoy watching colours for a bike build.

We will see when the parts pile is here.
 
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That looks really nice. Thanks for the tips Matti.

Currently I am waiting for the frame to arrive. (Ruff Cycles mentioned a shipping time up to 10 days, but its three weeks already?!??). Their customer support is great and told they will be shipping soon, so that will be fine.

The lasercutter for the fork crown plates is the same: 3 days till its ready. Now also 2 weeks waiting.

I don't mind waiting a long time, but when a company advertises with a short delivery time, the expectations will be there as well for many customers.

What are your thoughts on:
  • RAL8001:
RAL8001 frame
  • RAL3005: (Indian colour?)
RAL3005 bike
  • RAL8022: (blackbrown)
  • RAL3007 (blackred)
RAL3007


Still looking for a nice antique-vibe colour. I really enjoy watching colours for a bike build.

We will see when the parts pile is here.
A bit too dark to my taste, i'd go for something more 3001'ish :D But if to choose only from options above, 3005 is the closest to what tickles my aesthetics :)
 
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So thanks to Matti I started reading this forum's older posts about patina, I saw more nice colours (sorry for the doubt/speculation).

RAL6019 or 6021.

The lasercut plating came in, but there's a problem with it; the oval shaped holes are missing.

L3OwGAq.jpeg

Drawing for reference

VD3En5C.jpeg



The top plate, where the clamp will be fixed onto, is perfect!
So I started my work to fix the clamp on the top plate. First I drilled 4.5mm holes for a countersunk screw (M4). Then drilled the top hole bigger to fit tools through that hole so I can secure the screws.
This plate will be welded/soldered on the top plate in time.

alDWh5S.jpeg

Ns61dk6.jpeg


O2wRvxQ.jpeg

3giPu7z.jpeg


Testfit on the headtube shaft. For clamping-and-not-destroying-the-headset's-threads-matters, there will be a bush/tube between them.

That way I can adjust the headset bearing without putting unnecessary stress on the fork tubes and plates. And there will be no play when riding. I don't like rattles or shaky bits on my bike.

The lasercutter will cut new plates for me this week. Maybe I can use these for another build :grin:
 
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It must feel good to have those parts in your hands after all those efforts to design them :)
Thanks GeePig. It really does!
Maybe it sounds a bit strange, but currently I am employed as a mechanical designer. Great company, great high-tech products, but: due to my experience, my work got a lot more bureaucratic, more talking, less designing. So right now my creativity is going in my bicycle builds, helping others building their stuff etcetera.
I am at a (luxury) point right now, where I maybe am going to give some free classes/courses to people that need that little extra push to start wrenching on their own bikes or other stuff. No judgement, just having some fun and learning doing so.

So, feel free to ask, I don't know everything aswell ;)
 
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Thanks GeePig. It really does!
Maybe it sounds a bit strange, but currently I am employed as a mechanical designer. Great company, great high-tech products, but: due to my experience, my work got a lot more bureaucratic, more talking, less designing. So right now my creativity is going in my bicycle builds, helping others building their stuff etcetera.
I am at a (luxury) point right now, where I maybe am going to give some free classes/courses to people that need that little extra push to start wrenching on their own bikes or other stuff. No judgement, just having some fun and learning doing so.

So, feel free to ask, I don't know everything as well ;)
I am an engineer as well, but I have been an editor for the last 20 years and so this is my opportunity to do some design work as well. I really think it is a good idea to offer free encouragement and classes, I have learned a whole bunch of interesting and useful things from classes outside the regular system!
 
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I have learned a whole bunch of interesting and useful things from classes outside the regular system!
Refreshing and the sign of a true passion for your chosen profession.

I do not have a formal degree in anything, though I do have a lot of post-high school formal/professional education. All of that formal education has been good as a benchmark for many things, but learning from others and regularly going outside the proverbial box to deal at levels above those who stop at formal education seems to work best for most who dare to venture.
 
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Snap! My latest build's waterjet-cut parts recently came minus the hole for the ignition barrel which was present on the cad drawing. S - - t happens....
Cutters re-did the part for me.

DSCN4014.JPG

PS: RAL 'Curry' (kinda baby poop-ish, looks much better than it sounds) is a cool vintage colour.
I'm definitely planning on painting a future build this hue.
 

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Update:

I made some sketches for a fork-welding-JIG. Looked for parts in my parts bin, but could not find everything I needed.
Most frame and fork building JIG's are made of extruded aluminum profiles. So eventually found a shop where I ordered some bit and pieces.

XagEw6C.jpeg

1 inch fork tube, some wedges and my steel beam. Not using this unfortunately.

tWBsjg7.jpeg

Picture above: Fork JIG inspiration picture. My JIG will be a little bit different.

89oGSOF.jpeg

Colouring page (for the fans! :grin: )

249x31q.jpeg

Fork length and tube sizing in milimeters.

Some thoughts I would like to share:
I have a Shimano CB-E110 hub left. I can use this hub as a drum/coasterbrake front hub. The wide nut on the coasterbrake-arm side could be shortened a bit to fit the 110mm hub there.
Does this make the (already reliable) bicycle even more reliable? Being able to swap the front/rear wheels? :bigsmile:

I do not know anything about the thickness/diameter of the "Ruff Cycles Porucho" tubing, so I hope this fork fits the design a bit. The fork is not as fat as some "large diameter" triple tree forks that are used for this frame.
If it does not fit the looks, I can always build a fatter fork with my fork building JIG.


Thanks for reading, liking and tips as always!
Man, that’s a lot of work.
 
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I am an engineer as well, but I have been an editor for the last 20 years and so this is my opportunity to do some design work as well. I really think it is a good idea to offer free encouragement and classes, I have learned a whole bunch of interesting and useful things from classes outside the regular system!
Awesome GeePig, what kind of products do you work on if I may ask?

Refreshing and the sign of a true passion for your chosen profession.

I do not have a formal degree in anything, though I do have a lot of post-high school formal/professional education. All of that formal education has been good as a benchmark for many things, but learning from others and regularly going outside the proverbial box to deal at levels above those who stop at formal education seems to work best for most who dare to venture.
I can relate, even though I finished my bachelor engineering studies, most of my used knowledge is from practise. Not to judge, but a lot of young master-degree engineers which are really good at research, don't know how to remove a bicycle wheel in my experience.
Awesome Karate Chicken, thanks :thumbsup:

Snap! My latest build's waterjet-cut parts recently came minus the hole for the ignition barrel which was present on the cad drawing. S - - t happens....
Cutters re-did the part for me.

View attachment 176844

PS: RAL 'Curry' (kinda baby poop-ish, looks much better than it sounds) is a cool vintage colour.
I'm definitely planning on painting a future build this hue.
Those are sweet pieces, for what build is that?

Man, that’s a lot of work.
I considered, I will probably build forever, so a fork JIG comes in handy :cool:

Pictures below! The newly lasercut parts came in and are perfect. I thanked the guys for their sportmanship. Instantly started filing and fitting.


sq7xxUH.jpeg

UCSQKUc.jpeg

Lasercut edges, maybe far fetched, but I am going to file them a bit for a older/cleaner look.

VaHq9si.jpeg

5sbQ26c.jpeg

Two pictures above: A very cheap carbide lamp that I bought. I don't like the attached visor, so I will remove that and rebuild it/alter it a bit. Maybe use a (USB fed?) battery with lamp.

lo6Ctgu.jpeg

LOcmWDj.jpeg

B2uEgqs.jpeg

Explanation:
The oval holes in the lasercut parts are a tad bit to small. So I file the fork and press/hammer on the lasercut plate. Everytime it stops I can see these scratches that indicate the parts that I need to file again. I check in between with a square measuring iron.
File, tap, measure repeat! That's all!

9fUQMnD.jpeg

4VwyzMG.jpeg

zwubnK4.jpeg

QWuLUpv.jpeg

sbkhTfl.jpeg

NukDhRk.jpeg

rhdT9vR.jpeg

6PTjBEU.jpeg

Pictures above: Loose mockup, no bushing and alignment yet. Just mocking up to get excited and sweaty! :grin:
Very happy with the overal look so far!

Thanks for all the awesome replies!!
 
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Awesome GeePig, what kind of products do you work on if I may ask?

I specialised in anything between the air filter and the muffler on internal combustion engines, including exhaust gas recirculation and catching oil droplets attempting to leave the engine without permission. Essentially, if there was some kind of droplet or grime in a moving gas stream, then I was your man. Lawnmowers, cars, motorcycles, military unmanned air vehicles and naval firepumps mostly, including running a Wankel rotary on diesel using a carburettor (answer: yes, it is possible, but difficult to start during cold weather, and do you really need an engine shooting excess unburned fuel out of the exhaust for a firepump application on a ship?) and rediscovering why updraft carburettors fell out of fashion (answer: fuel accumulates on the walls of the intake system when running at idle, and drips down into your airfilter or onto the tarmac).
 
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Awesome GeePig, what kind of products do you work on if I may ask?


I can relate, even though I finished my bachelor engineering studies, most of my used knowledge is from practise. Not to judge, but a lot of young master-degree engineers which are really good at research, don't know how to remove a bicycle wheel in my experience.
Awesome Karate Chicken, thanks :thumbsup:


Those are sweet pieces, for what build is that?


I considered, I will probably build forever, so a fork JIG comes in handy :cool:

Pictures below! The newly lasercut parts came in and are perfect. I thanked the guys for their sportmanship. Instantly started filing and fitting.


sq7xxUH.jpeg

UCSQKUc.jpeg

Lasercut edges, maybe far fetched, but I am going to file them a bit for a older/cleaner look.

VaHq9si.jpeg

5sbQ26c.jpeg

Two pictures above: A very cheap carbide lamp that I bought. I don't like the attached visor, so I will remove that and rebuild it/alter it a bit. Maybe use a (USB fed?) battery with lamp.

lo6Ctgu.jpeg

LOcmWDj.jpeg

B2uEgqs.jpeg

Explanation:
The oval holes in the lasercut parts are a tad bit to small. So I file the fork and press/hammer on the lasercut plate. Everytime it stops I can see these scratches that indicate the parts that I need to file again. I check in between with a square measuring iron.
File, tap, measure repeat! That's all!

9fUQMnD.jpeg

4VwyzMG.jpeg

zwubnK4.jpeg

QWuLUpv.jpeg

sbkhTfl.jpeg

NukDhRk.jpeg

rhdT9vR.jpeg

6PTjBEU.jpeg

Pictures above: Loose mockup, no bushing and alignment yet. Just mocking up to get excited and sweaty! :grin:
Very happy with the overal look so far!

Thanks for all the awesome replies!!

Forks coming together nicely.

Those waterjet-cut parts of mine are for my ongoing latest build. Build thread is featured in the Gas Powered Bikes section of this forum.
Thread titled:... No. 3 build ready to kick off...
 

us56456712

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Update:

I made some sketches for a fork-welding-JIG. Looked for parts in my parts bin, but could not find everything I needed.
Most frame and fork building JIG's are made of extruded aluminum profiles. So eventually found a shop where I ordered some bit and pieces.

XagEw6C.jpeg

1 inch fork tube, some wedges and my steel beam. Not using this unfortunately.

tWBsjg7.jpeg

Picture above: Fork JIG inspiration picture. My JIG will be a little bit different.

89oGSOF.jpeg

Colouring page (for the fans! :grin: )

249x31q.jpeg

Fork length and tube sizing in milimeters.

Some thoughts I would like to share:
I have a Shimano CB-E110 hub left. I can use this hub as a drum/coasterbrake front hub. The wide nut on the coasterbrake-arm side could be shortened a bit to fit the 110mm hub there.
Does this make the (already reliable) bicycle even more reliable? Being able to swap the front/rear wheels? :bigsmile:

I do not know anything about the thickness/diameter of the "Ruff Cycles Porucho" tubing, so I hope this fork fits the design a bit. The fork is not as fat as some "large diameter" triple tree forks that are used for this frame.
If it does not fit the looks, I can always build a fatter fork with my fork building JIG.


Thanks for reading, liking and tips as always!
You can’t use a coaster for a front brake. You need a long gearshift like lever and all your hand force to get it to work. Believe me I spent a summer trying to get one to work on the front With cables. I even welded the ball so it would alway be ready to catch. I tried a variety of levers. If the brake lever is designed to pull twice as far then you have half the leverage. All you get is an almost noticeable slight drag with tremendous squeezing force.
 

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@OddJob is the patina master. He has a technique with spray paint to simulate rust.

"Spray a few spots of Cinnamon and Dark Taupe where you want rust to be. Cover those spots with mustard so that will wash off with the top coat after it's applied and reveal the 'surreal rust'."

View attachment 175909
View attachment 175908View attachment 175907View attachment 175906
Photo examples are on plastic
Paul Brodie makes replicas of 1919 Excelsior twin cam board track racers. There are no real ones left so he used photos and other period Excelsiors as a starting point for his computer mock up. Most are shiny showroom new. He made one with patina and it’s unbelievable. Top speed is supposed to be 120 mph+. Look at how thin the frame tubing is. It’s how they saved weight but its too much like a bicycle to be ridden at 120. They sell for around $165,000.
1636249854590.jpeg
 
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I specialised in anything between the air filter and the muffler on internal combustion engines, including exhaust gas recirculation and catching oil droplets attempting to leave the engine without permission. Essentially, if there was some kind of droplet or grime in a moving gas stream, then I was your man. Lawnmowers, cars, motorcycles, military unmanned air vehicles and naval firepumps mostly, including running a Wankel rotary on diesel using a carburettor (answer: yes, it is possible, but difficult to start during cold weather, and do you really need an engine shooting excess unburned fuel out of the exhaust for a firepump application on a ship?) and rediscovering why updraft carburettors fell out of fashion (answer: fuel accumulates on the walls of the intake system when running at idle, and drips down into your airfilter or onto the tarmac).
That seems like an awesome job. Doing research in theory and practice :thumbsup:
Forks coming together nicely.

Those waterjet-cut parts of mine are for my ongoing latest build. Build thread is featured in the Gas Powered Bikes section of this forum.
Thread titled:... No. 3 build ready to kick off...
Thanks, I will check that out!

You can’t use a coaster for a front brake. You need a long gearshift like lever and all your hand force to get it to work. Believe me I spent a summer trying to get one to work on the front With cables. I even welded the ball so it would alway be ready to catch. I tried a variety of levers. If the brake lever is designed to pull twice as far then you have half the leverage. All you get is an almost noticeable slight drag with tremendous squeezing force.
I am happy with your message, this was an idea that popped up in my head, but I never took the time to really think about it.
You last sentence made me chuckle :grin: I can see it vividly: Big eyeballs from the rider trying to squeeze that brake lever and a bike that just keeps rollin' :rofl:

Paul Brodie makes replicas of 1919 Excelsior twin cam board track racers. There are no real ones left so he used photos and other period Excelsiors as a starting point for his computer mock up. Most are shiny showroom new. He made one with patina and it’s unbelievable. Top speed is supposed to be 120 mph+. Look at how thin the frame tubing is. It’s how they saved weight but its too much like a bicycle to be ridden at 120. They sell for around $165,000.View attachment 177078

That is so awesome. I will check his name out on the internet! The picture says: "Yesterdays", this is a company in the Netherlands (I have not visited it yet).
A while ago, I visited a (now retired) colleague of mine that restores bikes from that era. He lives in a village nearby.
He has this big shed where he can mill parts, solder frames and even cast small parts of aluminum.
Bikes from 1895 to 1922.
Brands like Alcyon and a Cleveland 2 stroke:
800px-Cleveland_2_stroke.jpg

:inlove:


Build Related:
Checking for parts. I saw a nice wheelset from 1930 for sale that has wooden rims. But they are the "584" size. It is more difficult to find balloon tires than the standard 26" or "559" size... just dreaming.

No sign from Ruff Cycles unfortunately, they said they would ship, but that is weeks ago... No hurry, I'll wait.

This week I hope to finish the bushings for the fork, which means I can put it in the fork JIG and plan the welding process.
Maybe already mentioned it: At first I wanted to go oldschool and solder the fork. Now probably TIG weld it to keep it in line with the Porucho frame. (I think this frame is TIG welded).

Thanks again for the awesome replies.
 

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That seems like an awesome job. Doing research in theory and practice :thumbsup:

Thanks, I will check that out!


I am happy with your message, this was an idea that popped up in my head, but I never took the time to really think about it.
You last sentence made me chuckle :grin: I can see it vividly: Big eyeballs from the rider trying to squeeze that brake lever and a bike that just keeps rollin' :rofl:



That is so awesome. I will check his name out on the internet! The picture says: "Yesterdays", this is a company in the Netherlands (I have not visited it yet).
A while ago, I visited a (now retired) colleague of mine that restores bikes from that era. He lives in a village nearby.
He has this big shed where he can mill parts, solder frames and even cast small parts of aluminum.
Bikes from 1895 to 1922.
Brands like Alcyon and a Cleveland 2 stroke:
800px-Cleveland_2_stroke.jpg

:inlove:


Build Related:
Checking for parts. I saw a nice wheelset from 1930 for sale that has wooden rims. But they are the "584" size. It is more difficult to find balloon tires than the standard 26" or "559" size... just dreaming.

No sign from Ruff Cycles unfortunately, they said they would ship, but that is weeks ago... No hurry, I'll wait.

This week I hope to finish the bushings for the fork, which means I can put it in the fork JIG and plan the welding process.
Maybe already mentioned it: At first I wanted to go oldschool and solder the fork. Now probably TIG weld it to keep it in line with the Porucho frame. (I think this frame is TIG welded).

Thanks again for the awesome replies.
You can build your own wood wheels with your own hubs. So far I have built 8. Four have the carbon fiber liner so you can use higher pressure. The problem with all of them is they wander, warp and the spoke tension gets soft. I’m usually doing tuning every few months on them. In august I did a 12 hour time trial and after driving 4 hours south to the track the front wheel developed a wobble In the carrier. I had the tools with me so I trued it before the TT. Here is the bike I rode in theTT with wood wheels I built.
2E0C20AE-81C7-472F-8A5D-538E3078FAAC.jpeg
 
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You can build your own wood wheels with your own hubs. So far I have built 8. Four have the carbon fiber liner so you can use higher pressure. The problem with all of them is they wander, warp and the spoke tension gets soft. I’m usually doing tuning every few months on them. In august I did a 12 hour time trial and after driving 4 hours south to the track the front wheel developed a wobble In the carrier. I had the tools with me so I trued it before the TT. Here is the bike I rode in theTT with wood wheels I built.View attachment 177983
Wow awesome bike (wooden wheels, skip tooth and more) and it seems like an epic ride.
Do you have alignment benches / molds to build your wooden wheels?
I saw your "Oranjeboom Klunker" build and the description of that ride which inspired me to build my Electra RS klunker bike! I find people that do it a bit different interesting. So thank you sir for that.

This weekend I went to a American Motorcycle museum in Raalte (45 minutes drive for me). It is small but really nice! Old building with wood and bricks and lots of early 1900's motorcycles :inlove:
Beautiful restorations and rats/patina motorcycles. Also parts for sale.

American Motorcycle Museum (some pictures)

I use Imgur as a free photohosting site...

G5yadiM.jpeg

FOU97yT.jpeg

WHPRZBe.jpeg

1qZOAmq.jpeg

FYUG1VN.jpeg

pO2UzXT.jpeg

HXIk8qH.jpeg

jl4SM6H.jpeg

51b0XXU.jpeg

gBCsHD6.jpeg

9VHL1Zp.jpeg

J4jebPv.jpeg

GfnT22m.jpeg

rEsKzld.jpeg

cimTQMs.jpeg

2jlGAE2.jpeg

HRjF8op.jpeg

v7DMBuH.jpeg


That last bike seems Swedish. Swedish bikes (Crescent, Monark) have lots of American influenced parts.
 
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Build update:

HsXRdlJ.jpeg

Top plate and tube notches align perfectly!!

iTgooba.jpeg

jKeNIQX.jpeg

Crown with the CrMo bush.

5jOMAam.jpeg

X9o5rpL.jpeg

Bush and crown pressing with a hydraulic press. Went perfectly. It is quite tight but still removable with a very strong pulling tool.

YYdwsBf.jpeg

Result!

Next step: put it in the alignment JIG and prepare for TIG welding/Soldering.
 
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