CyCLo KiLLeR - the first cut is the deepest...

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Jun 13, 2015
1,106
2,036
44
US occupied MA
Awesome idea for the handlebars!
 
Dec 11, 2011
835
935
Central Ohio
Before I get to the craziness, I’ll show you the poor mans way of making a straight cut, if you don’t have a machine shop and just have primitive tools.

First I made a guide out of PVC pipe. It works well if you can find a piece that is the right inside diameter for what you are doing. If you can’t, you can also just use wire ties as well, anything that you can clamp or fasten on and that will give you a “shoulder” to guide your saw.

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Once it is in place, just start going around it with a hacksaw and make a groove in the metal where you want your cut to be.

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If you’re making the whole cut with a hacksaw you can leave the guide on until you’re done. If you want to switch to some other sort of tool you can remove it once you’ve got a deep enough groove to guide your tool. Sometimes I just go at it with a portable band saw, but more often than not it gets off 90 degrees at some point and throws off what you’re trying to do. This way takes a little longer, but you get better results.

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Once you get your hunk of metal removed, go back with a sanding block or file and clean everything up a bit and you should have a nice 90 degree cut.

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Dec 11, 2011
835
935
Central Ohio
In general this all came out how I had hoped, however there are a few things that bother me. The angle of the stem is just not quite right (it has a 6 degree angle, and should be a little more. Not sure if a 7 degree would change enough, and 10 degree might be too much). Also, while I really like the look of the bars, they are less than ideal for this application from a rideability standpoint. It will turn, but not much. Going to mess with some other bars and see what I can come up with. There’s just too little space at the center on these.

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Mar 26, 2012
8,418
16,812
Maplewood, MN
Unique solution!
Appears steering will bind without bearings. With it should work fine.
The sais and crosbow are killer!:ninja:
I have adapted head sets in the past using nylon washers found at Ace Hardware in lieu of ball bearings. They can be shaped to fit any head set cup, stacked if need be, and lubed with grease just like a ball bearing. One or two nylon washers in your design @Toeslider would aid in the 'fluidness' of your steering for sure. They come in many I.D. sizes, and grind down easily ( go gentle, they grind up fast!) to fit your desired O.D.
 
Jul 10, 2018
522
1,123
I have adapted head sets in the past using nylon washers found at Ace Hardware in lieu of ball bearings. They can be shaped to fit any head set cup, stacked if need be, and lubed with grease just like a ball bearing. One or two nylon washers in your design @Toeslider would aid in the 'fluidness' of your steering for sure. They come in many I.D. sizes, and grind down easily ( go gentle, they grind up fast!) to fit your desired O.D.

Splitting the head tube greatly compromises structure. The top and down tubes will flex and twist under load. An ideal solution would be to place the top half of threadedless headsets with cups on both sides of the Ahead stem. The top locknut would serve as the preload. That would of course require enough room for cups, bearings and the races.

Another possibility aside from using nylon washers would be to add a brace to join the head tubes together from say the front leaving the rear open effectively making it one piece again. The stem could move freely by adjusting it between the spaces of the head tubes, no bearings or spacers necessary.

It's an assassin bike... moves have to be very precise.
 

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