New Guy with a (Don't Laugh) Walmart Bike

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We love all bikes here

Welcome aboard
This is totally what I love about this place, the first rule is there aren't any. It's all about bikes-period. There's no snobbery or judgement about what you ride or where it came from, Walmart, a dumpster or curb rescue, thrift store, recycling center, it really doesn't matter. Around here, it's far more noble to rescue what many people would consider garbage and have a blast riding it than dropping most of a month's pay on whatever "the cool kids" are riding. We really are quite like people who would rather rescue a dirty, homeless dog or cat from an animal shelter than drop a few thousand buying purebreds from a breeder. In the end, rescue bikes, like rescue animals, are the loyalest of companions
 

Tallbikeman

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Looking up the specifications this has an alloy rim so replacement should also be alloy. Braking is much better with alloy rims. Our area has a volunteer run shop that teaches and helps repair bicycles for little or nothing. You might have a similar one in your area. The dump is chalk full of bicycles that have been taken from the garbage stream and put into a bicycle area. One can go there and buy a bicycle or parts. If you can find a cheap enough new wheel that might just be the way to go. I'm a Clyde so my rear wheels always have to be tougher than normal. Good luck with your search.
 
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I took a Walmart cruiser that was on sale for 99 bucks and also found the frame to be pretty well made. I went through it to be sure it had enough lube. Some of it did, most of it needed some grease. It came with alloy rims, all I did was put on some Duro tires and it was a decent cruiser. A neighbor bought it from me for $120 so I actually made a profit.
I'm making a bike for the ORBO using the cheapest Chinese frame I could find, and it seems to be built well enough. I think it's the components that make these bikes get junked easily. I helped out a shop get donated bikes going for the needy and in rehab who needed transportation. Of the 40 or 50 bikes, most were the cheapest mountain bikes from Walmart. None of the frames had a problem, just the brakes, gears, and everything else.
50600_2e78f9165914efe62bf6adb61fdbb546.jpg
 
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None of the frames had a problem, just the brakes, gears, and everything else.
The frame itself is honestly really nice. HEAVY, but out of what I was offered? I wanted the simplicity of a hardtail. No bells. No whistles. Hardtail.

Literally a case of 'I slammed the rear tire and am not a light guy.'
 

Tallbikeman

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I took a Walmart cruiser that was on sale for 99 bucks and also found the frame to be pretty well made. I went through it to be sure it had enough lube. Some of it did, most of it needed some grease. It came with alloy rims, all I did was put on some Duro tires and it was a decent cruiser. A neighbor bought it from me for $120 so I actually made a profit.
I'm making a bike for the ORBO using the cheapest Chinese frame I could find, and it seems to be built well enough. I think it's the components that make these bikes get junked easily. I helped out a shop get donated bikes going for the needy and in rehab who needed transportation. Of the 40 or 50 bikes, most were the cheapest mountain bikes from Walmart. None of the frames had a problem, just the brakes, gears, and everything else.
View attachment 181518
You are so right about components chosen for really cheap bikes. I've had problems with too cheap hubs that couldn't really be set up properly. The hubs were 3 piece steel and I think they moved a little during adjustment and riding. Very poor quality. I've had trouble with brakes that couldn't be made to center reliably so they always ended up rubbing on the rims. For just a few dollars more some of Walmarts offerings are quite usable and durable. I've had good luck with some of the Walmart Schwinn offerings. If you are willing to change out poor quality components I think the frames will hold up well enough.
 
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A Huffy Parkside was my first bike getting back into bikes as an adult. I found it a really comfortable bike to ride (paved roads only), but like you I also needed to change the crankset. Had hills to climb and that front sprocket was way too big for me.
Enjoy the journey.
 
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You don't need a truing stand, can be done with a simple trick using zip ties
Given the spoke wrench tol is arriving tomorrow? I'm going to give this a try, any advice given my eyes are.... not that great?

I'm well aware the wheel will never be 'true' but still. it not constantly wanting to go even worse out of warp would be great.
 
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Well. my back wheel is beyond my ability to fix.

Tried fiddling with a spoke wrench and didn't get anywhere. took the whole wheel off to get a better look at hte problem and... the thing is very visibly bowed out bad enough I'm going to have t otake it to a professional. May just be better to buy a back wheel.

And i can't do that right now because our drier ... broke. it WORKS, except it isn't making heat. so the heating element is probably fried.

Edit: Stepdad's willing to help, but he seems laser focused on finding something at amazon (probably due to the fact he has prime.)

Combination of 27.5 wheels, rim/v brakes, and a freewheel hub seems to be some kind of unicorn combination.

Edit: After watching soem videos on how to deal with actual wheel warping as opposed to minor adjustments with a spoke wrench.... I have some work ahead of me.

Weird thing is every guide i saw says that you tighten going counter clockwise and loosen going clockwise and... the threads i have aren't that. I have no idea ... is going on there. Maybe i'm misinterpreting what I read?

Edit:
Well, having peeled both wheels apart I'm... honestly glad I went and did that since several of the spokes were threatening to rip through the tape on there. Now I just gotta figure out how to straighten this thing out proper.

Easy enough in theory especially given the wheels i"ve seen put back to true on youtube, but still... I have no clue what I'm doing.
 
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View attachment 176928

Bike Model: Huffy Parkside Men's 27.5 SE

That was taken with my phone. So apologies for lack in quality. By that point I'd put a new crank on (that fit the existing square taper) and shortly after that photo I'd de-stickered it because 'really my guy? You're going to call this 'special edition' and all you did was have a different paint color, same lowest end parts ands stickers? Not even a proper headtube badge? Literally component for component there are no differences between this and the regular one.'

I am.... well aware of just how little biking communities think of big box bikes (bike shaped objects, dumpster bait, tacos in the making, etc etc.) I am also under no illusions of what i can and cannot do with this specific bike. No disc brake mounts (I'm unsure if the holes above the derailleur are for a rack, or brakes but given the front fork has no mounts I assume it's for a rack,) cheapest derailleur, etc. Welds are shockingly nice according to my brother (who has welded in past jobs so I trust his opinion over my own,) and the guy they pulled for assembly on it actually did a pretty reasonable job. Wheels probably aren't dead on true, but there's not an obvious wobble to them or anything.

Some Background: I have had lifelong vision issues preventing me from driving, and I am effectively live in help to care for my special needs siblings that both require full time care. The bike is a way for me to get some cardio in, and to just kinda mentally declutter for a bit while buzzing through the fields near my house (No shoulder back roads with a steep lip between it and the ground, no real nearby destinations of worth, and I honestly don't trust the drivers around here to not intentionally aim at me for points.)

Use Case: Buzz around nearby fields and essentially footpath trails (is there a trail grade that's less difficult than green? That most likely.) Most 'difficult' feature is the hilly nature of the terrain and the fact the rider is grossly out of shape. Have taken it on a few green space park paths but they're all dead level paved.... the actual use case advertised for.

Mostly just trying to get in better shape so I can go for longer rides, and not feel like my everything is going to fall out at the end of it.

That and I like to tinker. The bike was a gift. Make it the best version of itself that it can be.

Work Done: Installed an 'Action' crank as advised by Kev Central to take it down from 44t to 32t to accommodate for the grass and hills I'm riding on vs what (to huffy and walmart's credit) all the marketing points this bike at being intended for (smooth paths and roads.) Adjusted the derailleur and tightened the cables.

Needs doing: Frankly, I should pull the whole thing apart and grease the everloving schlitz out of everything since I genuinely don't trust the assemblers to have bothered doing more than a thin film and I've got a giant tub of lithium grease, but given the fiddly tiny nature of bearings I hadn't wanted to risk it even though I am like... 90% certain it's all caged bearings so less of a hassle for me to find if dropped (unless the bearings pop out of the cage.)

The derailleur needs replacing, but considering i've been on the fence on moving up to an 8 or 9 speed, staying at a 7 speed, and the fact the megarange freewheel seems to be about as easy to find as hen's teeth and if i change gearing i'd need to convert to a freewheel/cassette system which means either buy a hub and rebuild the rear wheel or buy a new wheel? I've been holding off on that.

Front fork could probably do with replacing given the hilly and rutted nature of where I normally ride Biggest problem is I don't like the idea of mixed disc/rim brakes on a bike and frankly I'd rather have matched rim brakes than front disc rear rim since 'uuugh that's how walmart gets people. prominently display the front disc brakes, make sure people won't casually notice the rear rim brakes.'

In Closing: I'm mostly here for information on what other people are doing and try finding some kind of supportive community. If my situation changes for the better I do want to go ride more, try actual trails. Where i live has a lot of very beautiful countryside.
Great stuff, all thread on cassettes are in short supply now. Heck it’s a bicycle, can’t fault that, at least not on this site, we aren’t picky, as long as you can ride it, good enough.
 

ifitsfreeitsforme

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I like those truing tricks.
 
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Well it isn't dead on true, but considering it doesn't hit either of the brake pads when rolling.....

My concern now is that it will just go back to broke after putting some weight on it for a few rides.
 

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