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Rätte-Hengel (redux)

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Had this entered in Build Off 12 but just wasn’t able to get it finished before the deadline-
http://www.ratrodbikes.com/forum/index.php?threads/rätte-hengel.103766/

So I thought I’d continue here in BUILDS.
Here's the lastest progress...

Rear wheel:
I used 5 different online spoke length calculators and NOT single one of them matched... But a average of the 5 results worked out pretty good. A simple jig for cutting and a thread roller borrowed from my friend and bicycle guru “Bicycle Bill” made quick work of it.

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Knowing that with such a large hub the spokes would be at a steep angle I decided to dimple the nipple holes a little. Made a little jig by simply drilling a countersink in a scrap of plate and tapping a flathead screw through. Had to repaint the rim...

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Using a motorcycle hub causes a few problems, just because it’s so much larger than a bicycle in every way. So truing such a wide wheel had to be done with an “alternative” truing stand (thank you Lugwig Drum company and an old fork)...

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The issue of oversized motorcycle-sized spoke holes was solved by drilling smaller one through the hub’s existing conveniently placed decorative dimples. A final old-school racing trick of wire & soiled spokes added some strength & stiffness.

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Bottom bracket:
I’ve found that by freezing pillow block bearings and heating the original bicycle races they can be pressed together. I used 3/4” core bearings for a solid pedal crank rod to be finished later. The bearings have a groove with holes so they can be greased, I cut a slot in the races and added fittings to the top of the BB...

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Headlight:
Chris had provided an interesting “Big Beam” housing that I just couldn’t resist. I decided to use the original light bulb as a lens and had to cut the thick glass (something I’ve never done before). Finally figured out that water and a Dremel diamond cutting disc would make this a fairly easy job, but I still managed to crack it in two during the last 1/2” of cutting.

Oh well, a little super glue and tape on the outside edges and I’ll just call it ratrod.

For a light source I’m using an off the shelf Schwinn light set, a simple little kit that has rubber housing that normally just straps to a handlebar and a side mounted on/off push switch.

There were a couple of existing taps in the light housing that were bent up to carry a little chunk of 1” tube for the light. In my spare parts box I found an old nickel plated spring loaded push button that was just the right size after I made a flat in the light housing.

It sounds so easy, but all this actually took several hours to finally work it all out...

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Taillight:
Same as the headlight, I made a little tube carrying mount by bending and cutting a chain link fence bracket (saved filing one square hole that way, HA!) I used a carriage bolt and some wooden plugs to keep the tube centered and then mounted to the luggage rack...

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Luggage Rack:
The original end of the rack was already broken and much too short for the newly stretched frame anyway. So I reshaped it a little and attached it to a bracket cut out of a old barn door hinge, mounted to the seat stay gusset.

A little touch of welding and then some distressed red paint later will add a little contrast to that dark area under the seat...

Note that both the rack and fender stays have been lengthened and curved to match the frame on the left side, to clear that extra wide honda hub...

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Jackshaft:

An simple affair, I just added a longer 5/8” axle and pillow block bearing on that heavy gusset to spread the load out a little.

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Intake Manifold:

I like using these thick oversized washers found at a local Farm/Tractor supply store for the flange ends, it saves a bit of time boring large holes...

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Used a little chunk of bent 1” tube and a simple wooden jig clamped to the cylinder to keep the carb-side end square and plumb, and a little tube topside for a hose to catch the case vent blow back- Ready to weld!

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Exhaust:
For the tight bend at the engine I made a series of pie-shaped cuts to be welded and ground smooth.

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I picked up this ancient 1” conduit bender at a flea market for $5, and it’s great for making larger curves even with something as thick as the black pipe I’m using here. Another handy tool (borrowed from Bicycle Bill) is this antique thread cutter.

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A finishing touch and a nod towards the post apocalypse, I fashioned the tailpipe after a Browning M1919 machine gun barrel. Used some more black pipe, turned down straight fittings to trap it, an 1.5” automotive thin walled tailpipe, and high temp grill paint--all assembled from actual downloaded dimensional drawings for reference to make it somewhat convincing. I must say, drilling 96 evenly spaced holes is a task!

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That’s it for now, but i do hope to work on it more this week!
 
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Been quite a while since i've made any updates about this project- The truth is i actually pretty much finished it by last Thanksgiving, but had been suffering a misbehaving computer. So here's the wrap up...

Building the tank:
Started by working out the shape in poster board.

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Then cutting the three main panels into 20G steel.

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I bought a inexpensive English Wheel from Harbor Freight a while back but have been a little intimidated by it. So this is really the first time i've ever really used it. (Which i will be using much more now!)

Dishing the top.

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Rough shaping the side panels in a dished stump (Medieval, LOL!). Back to the wheel to smooth them out and pre weld assembly pinned together with screws.

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Used the filler from the existing P-212 engine's tank and a old timely farm tractor sediment cup for a filter.

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Painted the tank in a traditional Hot Rodder's "scallop" style:

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Pin stripped it.

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And thoroughly distressed all that hard work. Also added a scruffy old Mason jar lid to hide the plastic gas cap.

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In honor of Chris's Danish ancestry i painted a "Viking Rat" cartoon in lieu of a head badge. And then later recreated it as a pen & ink drawing as per his request.

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R. Hengel logo .jpg
 
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A few final fabrications and assembly details:
Finished intake with another old coffee maker part as the filter cover.

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The finished drive train and a old Worksman chain guard on the pedal side. Extra wide pedal crank made from a cutting up a inexpensive chainring and welding and bolting the arms to a solid 3/4" rod (chainring welded to a keyed collar).

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And a custom belt guard made from 1/8" aluminum shaped over a anvil. (the little 25 cent saucepan lid is actually a recent additional as Chris was worried about getting his pants cuff caught on the rear CVT nut).

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I've also since reenforced the way the front half of the front fender was attached with an 1/8" steel bracket and two 1/4" screws. It was kind of a last minute decision to add it and originally wasn't really very secure before with a single small tab notched out of the back of the fender. It came undone when Chris was riding it resulting in a unfortunate incident locking up the front wheel. Thank goodness it was at low speed and neither bike or rider was too seriously hurt. Regardless i will never take this potentially dangerous detail lightly again!!!

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And here's a couple of little details Chris added that i plan on stealing for my future builds! Just a off the shelf bottle holder with a old can as a on board tool box and a simple wooden handle for the pull start...

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kingfish254

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Awesome ratty engineering and wicked fabrication. I especially like the tank and the exhaust. Great build!
 
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