Coasterbrake hub, with sealed industrial bearings

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Thanks a lot guys! Its kinda busy with two kids now, but everyone will have to get used to the Chopper.... ehh to the baby :grin:

Moeder is doing great and really taking good care of Thura. I am taking care of our two year old daughter most of the time now.
During the "kraamweek" we had help from a "kraamverzorgster". A nice lady that helps with the baby's and moms health (checking weight, temperature and milk intake) and with some chores around the house. This is normal in the Netherlands where you get help for a week.
Unfortunately I could not convince the lady to make a mockup with the chopper frame :bigsmile:
I'll make a thread soon.

Is this also common in the US or Canada? Where you get this kind of help the first week?

I did have some time to look for junk on the interwebs and found some hubs for 2 euros. They are from kids bikes, but almost new!
One is a 28 hole 1985 F&S Torpedo hub.

The other a F&S replica by Romet with less holes (I think a Polish buildoff participant mentioned this brand of hub/bike).
I ordered two extra hub flanges for this hub, so its 36 hole too! I can bolt or rivet the flanges or that hub.

KLoYD3W.jpeg



And I could not resist buying a 50's US wheelset with bendix hub: (Uncommon in the Netherlands)
Bought it from "bikestoremember.nl". They have some "New Departure model D's" with skip tooth as well. Including complete wheelsets.


GDS6KGv.jpeg

AhlGbBR.jpeg

tTaQHP8.jpeg

loAi3dy.jpeg


I don't know for which build I will use this set, maybe I will take a bike apart and build something new.
Thinking to take apart my green Electra RS Klunker and put this set on the frame and store it for a future buildoff....
Use the 26 inch Klunker wheelset for the chopper....
Also toying with the idea of throwing the chopper in the yard (with grease inside the frame) for a rat build. The frame is almost the same as the Nirve Cannibal/Switchblade.


In the coming months I will have time for a mockup and rearreangement of parts/bikes.

Thanks again!
 
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Is this also common in the US or Canada? Where you get this kind of help the first week?
Not exactly, we had a few check-ins from the midwife, but basically after we left the hospital, we were on our own. Family support, of course, but nothing like help with chores and feeding. That's why I thought you might have your hands full, around here that's up to Vader.
I could not convince the lady to make a mockup with the chopper frame
I never thought to ask for bike help
 

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Thanks a lot guys! Its kinda busy with two kids now, but everyone will have to get used to the Chopper.... ehh to the baby :grin:

Moeder is doing great and really taking good care of Thura. I am taking care of our two year old daughter most of the time now.
During the "kraamweek" we had help from a "kraamverzorgster". A nice lady that helps with the baby's and moms health (checking weight, temperature and milk intake) and with some chores around the house. This is normal in the Netherlands where you get help for a week.
Unfortunately I could not convince the lady to make a mockup with the chopper frame :bigsmile:
I'll make a thread soon.

Is this also common in the US or Canada? Where you get this kind of help the first week?

I did have some time to look for junk on the interwebs and found some hubs for 2 euros. They are from kids bikes, but almost new!
One is a 28 hole 1985 F&S Torpedo hub.

The other a F&S replica by Romet with less holes (I think a Polish buildoff participant mentioned this brand of hub/bike).
I ordered two extra hub flanges for this hub, so its 36 hole too! I can bolt or rivet the flanges or that hub.

KLoYD3W.jpeg



And I could not resist buying a 50's US wheelset with bendix hub: (Uncommon in the Netherlands)
Bought it from "bikestoremember.nl". They have some "New Departure model D's" with skip tooth as well. Including complete wheelsets.


GDS6KGv.jpeg

AhlGbBR.jpeg

tTaQHP8.jpeg

loAi3dy.jpeg


I don't know for which build I will use this set, maybe I will take a bike apart and build something new.
Thinking to take apart my green Electra RS Klunker and put this set on the frame and store it for a future buildoff....
Use the 26 inch Klunker wheelset for the chopper....
Also toying with the idea of throwing the chopper in the yard (with grease inside the frame) for a rat build. The frame is almost the same as the Nirve Cannibal/Switchblade.


In the coming months I will have time for a mockup and rearreangement of parts/bikes.

Thanks again!
In the US (for me anyhow) it involves a visit from at least one of the grandmother's for the first week or so. Sometimes the two grandmother's could be convinced to come consecutively and extend that out. But that was just our experiences. My mom has 32 grandchildren and 8 great grandchildren. She's quite doting and fond of the babies
 
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In the US (for me anyhow) it involves a visit from at least one of the grandmother's for the first week or so. Sometimes the two grandmother's could be convinced to come consecutively and extend that out. But that was just our experiences. My mom has 32 grandchildren and 8 great grandchildren. She's quite doting and fond of the babies
That seems awesome as well. We did not ask for presents, but food and meals, because you are quite busy that first period.

Not exactly, we had a few check-ins from the midwife, but basically after we left the hospital, we were on our own. Family support, of course, but nothing like help with chores and feeding. That's why I thought you might have your hands full, around here that's up to Vader.

I never thought to ask for bike help
Canada is hardcore 😉


Alright, I have some updates: I milled/turned the flanges and pressed them onto the hub base.

I did not alter the Romet hub or @GeePig could get angry :grin: only slightly brushed the outside of the hub flanges so I could get a 'surface' to press the flanges on.

The flange is not perfect for the Romet hub, but they were leftovers, so I don't mind.
When disassembling the Romet hub, I found that it is almost unused.

fortkhr.jpeg

M7gKjJe.jpeg

Romet hub (above)

Or2C7fp.jpeg

IVy2Atg.jpeg


Next:
Removing the flanges and drill the "countersunk" holes for the spokes, because you can't reach it afterwards.
Then: welding or soldering, we will see.

Thanks for watching!
 
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Nice work on the hubs!

Those Romet rear hubs are actually made by a Czech company, Velosteel, and I am currently stripping down an older version from a Ukraine bicycle. I have no idea how a Fichtel & Sachs design ended up being so popular here, though.
It is a good solid design, but on the other hand, the "1907 New Departure patent on a coasterbrake hub with that multi-cycle threaded clutch" (like the Shimano CB-E110) is even more simple and it is solid. You just gotta keep the water and rain out.

I still wonder why that grease nipple is phased out over the years. Planned obsolescence? Too expensive with todays industry?

Project going slow, but we have some progress!

To get industrial bearing cylindrical fit on the location of the original cup-cone bearings, you need to do some milling and use adapters.
On the brake cone (where you assemble the coasterbrake-arm) there were no modifications done, just a adapter ring.

Pictures below where I point with a red pen: I am thinking to 'lock' the adapter-ring on the original parts by creating a little burr. It is already a tight fitting that needs a vice or hydraulic press to assemble. But I like it extra secure without bringing in heat from welding. Some original coasterbrake parts are heat treated for hardness and wear-resistance. On the other hand I am not using loctite for it, since loctite weakens when it gets hot, which is in this case, caused by braking for prolonged times at speeds.

For you wondering: the brass nut is a '17mm wrench fit, M10x1 threaded, 12mm bearing fitting, drive side' end nut.

foO0Ync.jpeg

EDRi7Qv.jpeg

Otbzkx1.jpeg

foO0Ync.jpeg

to7WmwU.jpeg

Last picture: Flange width.

With the bushes (3x) in between the flanges and bolts + washers + nuts I can weld or solder the flanges on the base while the flanges remain aligned.

To do in this particular order:
  • Press on the bearing adapters I mentioned in this post.
  • Mill/turn the final fittings.
  • Countersink and debur the flanges before the final welding/soldering, or else I can't reach it with my hand drill anymore.
  • Maybe drill more holes in the flanges, because there is something I need to double check and I haven't thought/observed it before: The 36 spoke holes from the flanges are not symmetrical aligned. I wonder what would happen while building a wheel if they did. If this is figured out then:
  • Press the hub shell inside the CrMo tubes that are now the outer shell.
  • Mill/turn the large bearing fittings in the outer CrMo shell. And finish the complete shell with flanges: deburring, rounding etcetera.
  • Drill a threaded hole through both shells (the CrMo and Shimano shell) to fit a grease nipple. Location to be determined. Somewhere between the flanges depending on the ultimate grease position.
  • Do a test-assembly to check if everything is OK.
  • Powercoat the hub.
  • Final Assembly,

Thanks for reading and let me know if I missed anything.
 

Ulu

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I finally caught up with this one, just because I love the decorative flange work. I don’t own a lathe, so no chance of me turning out stuff like this right now.

I have some bicycle hubs like this where you can press the flanges on and off, but I’m not sure how I could get the spoke indexing correct if I did that. Did you make some kind of indexing tool?

What do you think about the laser cutting versus waterjet cutting on parts like this?

I’ll have to send out a DXF or similar and have them cut.

I am from the days when we had to draw the stuff on mylar with ink, and then an “electric eye” would follow the pattern, and cut your parts with an acetylene torch. It was all big industrial stuff.

I wasn’t doing any delicate parts like this, so I don’t have a clue about lasers and water jets, and only one little experience with EDM.

All the light gauge work I ever drew was Stamped out on an AMADA turret press. I did steel cabinetry & little parts for vending machines.
 
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I finally caught up with this one, just because I love the decorative flange work. I don’t own a lathe, so no chance of me turning out stuff like this right now.

I have some bicycle hubs like this where you can press the flanges on and off, but I’m not sure how I could get the spoke indexing correct if I did that. Did you make some kind of indexing tool?

What do you think about the laser cutting versus waterjet cutting on parts like this?

I’ll have to send out a DXF or similar and have them cut.

I am from the days when we had to draw the stuff on mylar with ink, and then an “electric eye” would follow the pattern, and cut your parts with an acetylene torch. It was all big industrial stuff.

I wasn’t doing any delicate parts like this, so I don’t have a clue about lasers and water jets, and only one little experience with EDM.

All the light gauge work I ever drew was Stamped out on an AMADA turret press. I did steel cabinetry & little parts for vending machines.

To be honest, I use a lathe at my employer in the machine shop.
I try and plan the whole thing and do not turn/mill stuff that takes longer than an hour or so.

I did not make an indexing tool. I just use my googly eyes!
I thought about it, but eventually it results in a few mm longer spoke worst case scenario.
The bottom V in my hearts in the flanges must align with a hole on the other flange, then its about right.

I have experience waterjet cutting on aluminum, but not on steel.
Laserjet on steel.
I like it, but some burs are just not great, I always try and round them with a dremel or file. Also for better paint adhesion and less chipping of paint on the corners.
I almost never powdercoat after lasercutting. Deburring first 😉

I really like the oldschool acetylene torch and stamping techniques!
This custom builder on youtube (Japhands Customz or Make it custom, don’t know for sure) uses these. I really like his work!

I made countersunk holes on all sides for the spokes. 90 degrees hole entry. Then deburred again with sandpaper.

Ready to weld or solder!
The three bushes and screws through the heart are for alignment when welding.

yx8659N.jpg

6IrDgMo.jpg

PJqd81u.jpg



What do you guys think?
Powdercoat in a colour, rusty rat or nickel/chrome?
Chrome and/or Nickel plated could be rather expensive for a fun tryout.
 

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