How to make and use Vinegar Custard for rust removal

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In this recipe i will use white vinegar, plain white flour, rusty objects and linseedoil:

Make a mix of flour and vinegar and stir well to avoid lumps:
IMG_20210722_133453.jpg

Boil the vinegar, when it comes to a boil turn down the heat and add the vinegar starch mixture. Keep stirring until it thickens to a real thick texture the consistency of wallpaperglue:
IMG_20210722_133949.jpg

I applied the goo while still warm, so it will thicken as it cools down, and create a firm layer around the object:
IMG_20210722_200602.jpg

IMG_20210722_200625.jpg

After +/- 20 hrs of marinating it looks even more delicious:
.
IMG_20210723_125642.jpg

You can see how the vinegar has ¨absorbed¨ the rust. Now it,s time for a scrub and a bath
The goo comes of relatively easy with a hard brush, taking the dirt and corrosion with it.
When it is clean, dry immediately and apply plenty of linseed oil, because otherwise the corrosion almost immediately returns. Use the scrubbing-side of a scrubbing sponge to get the oil deep into the pores of rough surfaces.
Before:
IMG_20210722_134423.jpg

After:
IMG_20210723_135055.jpg

If any corrosion returns re-apply more linseed oil.
Please refrain from stupid comments, this is a technical guide and i am trying to help people save bikes.
Ps.
Greetings from Amsterdam:
IMG_20210722_211746.jpg
 
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Awesome thread! I was already going to take your advice for this technique and now I have a better idea of how to implement the plan. Great info. Cheers!

P.S. The after picture is really impressive. I was planning on using a brass brush, but would you recommend something harder to scrape the vinegar custard with?
 
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There is no need for tools that damage the remaining chrome,
all i needed to remove the custard is a hard household brush like this:
brush.jpeg

And a scrubbing sponge like this to apply the linseed oil:
spons.jpeg

Use the scrubbing side only for non-smooth surfaces, to get the oil in the pores,
use the soft side for remaining chrome.
It may be useful to spray water over the custard to soften it up before removal,
and heating up the objects in the sun after rubbing with oil helps to ¨solidify¨ the coating.
Hempseed oil is ok. too.
 

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