TRADITIONAL Quasi-Motobike ..☆☆In the can!...pg 14!☆☆

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Awesome campsite OJ and the bike is looking great .
Thanks Brian. We have gone through many changes in 35 years from pup tent to large cabin tent to pop up trailer to hard shell trailer to slide outs on a bigger unit. The screen house has been a main fixture, and we want to restore that back with a new identical version in it's place. Like my oldest son said, "It has served us so well for the past almost 30 years. Let's shoot for another 30."

Many of our most cherished stories are from our days at the campsite. We tried to find a balance for the boys between computers and video games by having this outdoor experience being a regular part of their lives.
 
Day 21

I can't do any physical work with my hands, but I can shoot a video! Just found some antiques to add to the Quasi-Moto build. Take a 6 min coffee break....



Awesome! I love using period correct accessories and embellishments 😁
My youngest brother lives in Saint Paul, and one of my best friends is in Minneapolis. Hope to get out that way again sometime soon.

IYKYK

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I took a 6 min coffee break and enjoyed this wonderful vid, and right at the end saw the Thompson's Grips sticker on your tool box. :)
Great vid.
 
Awesome! I love using period correct accessories and embellishments 😁
My youngest brother lives in Saint Paul, and one of my best friends is in Minneapolis. Hope to get out that way again sometime soon.

IYKYK

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If you get out this way and have time, I'd love to host you for a tour of the BACK40. Some local brews might even be cracked!

Great cap. YKIK. 😁
 
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I took a 6 min coffee break and enjoyed this wonderful vid, and right at the end saw the Thompson's Grips sticker on your tool box. :)
Great vid.
Your stickers are in a couple spots in my workplaces. Proudly displayed!
 
Cool find. Reminds me of the custom commemorative brews I did for BEER RUN way back in BO6. Each brew was named after a prior winner.

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Cool find. Reminds me of the custom commemorative brews I did for BEER RUN way back in BO6. Each brew was named after a prior winner.

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Yeah, I want to create some labels that would be from that era for these beers and get a ratstorative recreation including them onto the wooden 6 pack carrier.
And people thought I wouldn't have anything to do for the next 2 months. :bigsmile:
 
Day 22

So, once again my worlds collide. With some of the discussion and photos of 'building beverages' this build off season, the topic of beer has 'come to a head' at times, so to speak. :grin: With my recent purchase of these antique regional beer bottles, I began to do some research on dating, types of glass, design of the bottle neck and tops, etc. So I guess you can expect to get a little education along with me in my thread from now on. Because you know I could never keep it 'bottled up' inside me! :wondering::hi::bigsmile:

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It turns out this type of bottle was used between the late 1800's and 1930's. So that puts it in my wheelhouse for the build.
One EDIT to my video monologue; it is the Jacob Schmidt Brewing Co., not the Joseph Schmidt Brewing Co as I stated.

In the video I mentioned how each bottle was embossed with the words "Bottle Can Not Be Sold". Here is what I found on the internets in regard to why that is stamped on there:

"Registered and Not To Be Sold bottles from the late 1800s up to the 1930s. The idea was to get people to bring the bottles back to the bottler. When you bought a soda or beer in those bottles, you were really only buying the beverage inside. The bottle remained the property of the bottler. A cent or two deposit was usually charged on the bottle, and was refunded if you returned it. Even with all of these measures, a lot of people still just tossed the bottles out instead of returning them. I'm sure it made the bottlers angry since it forced them to buy new bottles to replace the ones that were never returned, but I have never heard of anyone going to jail for stealing a registered soda bottle. " Whew! :wink1:

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I remember as a kid growing up in the late '50s - early '60s, that we had returnable bottles for various beverages, and those deposits were like 5 cents per bottle. My dad always had a case sitting out in our summer porch for the empties. And one of our jobs was to make sure those were along for our Saturday trip into town to turn in and replenish the stock.

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Day 23

I may have found a new hobby. As if I needed another one! When upon searching for some info on how to clean up these old bottles, and getting some more information on their age, etc, I made a new friend. His name is Barry, and he is part of a 2 man team called "Ibuyoldbeer.com". And, he's from St Paul, MN ; my home city!



So, Barry assures me that my bottles are 'pre-prohibition' so manufactured before 1919 and probably after 1900. They can also be capped like a modern bottle, so my beer making brother who also lives in St Paul will be able to help me cap them when the time comes. Whether I put actual beer in the bottles or colored water, I haven't decided.

Barry also gave me some insight in how to get the milky white discoloration out of the glass. Glass is actually permeable, meaning it has pores, which fill up with old moisture and when it settles in and is undisturbed for 100 years or so, it imbues into the glass and is very hard to get out. My first step was to put some muratic acid in the bottle, and then add some copper bb's to act as a 'media' which will move the acid around and 'bead blast' it up against the insides of the bottle. And then I poured the bbs into a 1 gallon freezer bag and shook it around to bead blast the outside of the bottles.

So, they got pretty clean with that round that I did last night. Then today I filled a bucket with my 50/50 water and white vinegar, and with a soft scrubbie, I submerged and scrubbed the bottles. Then while they were still wet, I put them back in the copper bb bag and shook them up again. Finally, they got rinsed off in a fresh water bucket. (the vinegar will leave a white substance on the surface if you don't rinse it off with pure water)

Here's some photos and in the second to last one you can see the difference from start to finish today. They aren't perfect but WAY cleaner than when I got them!

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Before today's cleaning on the right, after on the left.

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All cleaned up and no place to go. :grin:
 
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Pretty cool! I didn't realize old glass bottles could be restored.
Yeah, me either. Every endeavor has it's own unique ins and outs, tips and tricks. I'm always game to learn something new!
 
Day 23

I may have found a new hobby. As if I needed another one! When upon searching for some info on how to clean up these old bottles, and getting some more information on their age, etc, I made a new friend. His name is Barry, and he is part of a 2 man team called "Ibuyoldbeer.com". And, he's from St Paul, MN ; my home city!



So, Barry assures me that my bottles are 'pre-prohibition' so manufactured before 1919 and probably after 1900. They can also be capped like a modern bottle, so my beer making brother who also lives in St Paul will be able to help me cap them when the time comes. Whether I put actual beer in the bottles or colored water, I haven't decided.

Barry also gave me some insight in how to get the milky white discoloration out of the glass. Glass is actually permeable, meaning it has pores, which fill up with old moisture and when it settles in and is undisturbed for 100 years or so, it imbues into the glass and is very hard to get out. My first step was to put some muratic acid in the bottle, and then add some copper bb's to act as a 'media' which will move the acid around and 'bead blast' it up against the insides of the bottle. And then I poured the bbs into a 1 gallon freezer bag and shook it around to bead blast the outside of the bottles.

So, they got pretty clean with that round that I did last night. Then today I filled a bucket with my 50/50 water and white vinegar, and with a soft scrubbie, I submerged and scrubbed the bottles. Then while they were still wet, I put them back in the copper bb bag and shook them up again. Finally, they got rinsed off in a fresh water bucket. (the vinegar will leave a white substance on the surface if you don't rinse it off with pure water)

Here's some photos and in the second to last one you can see the difference from start to finish today. They aren't perfect but WAY cleaner than when I got them!

View attachment 266864View attachment 266868View attachment 266866View attachment 266867View attachment 266865

Before today's cleaning on the right, after on the left.

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All cleaned up and no place to go. :grin:


How to clean beer bottles, you hosers.

Party GIF by CBC
 
Technically, the photo from the campsite was taken in Wisconsin, but I catch your drift! 🤪

When I lit that fire yesterday around 9 am it was barely 50° out. We did have a beautiful day that got up to 73°, but only 43% humidity.

Heard some live music, cleared some brush from the winter tree fall, and topped it off with the jumbo shrimp special at The Shop Bar and Grill. They have cool signs, around 300 license plates adorning the walls, and this unique 'tapper'...

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Best shrimp around. Breading is light and not greasy, on a bed of hash browns topped with onions and melted cheddar cheese (we are in Wisconsin after all!) and home baked dinner rolls.

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Day 27

So, May is winding down. I have actually totally completed RRB BO builds by June 1 other years. I'm very close to wrapping up this build as well. And I have a week that is relatively free, but a few unpredictable happenings could change things. And, the longer I go, the more money I tend to spend on these builds! :bigsmile: To keep it more in my original budget, I might just finish it off here soon.

I do want to do something with the 'antique 6 pack' carrier. And fill the bottles and visit my brother in the city and get them capped.
I have access to another era specific accoutrement that might really be a highlight, but it would increase my budget by 28%. Since I gave up the bike shop job this summer, I'm not as flush as I have been other years. I got spoiled, and especially with that employee discount.

The kind of cool thing is, my very first ever RRB BO build was 'beer themed'. And now this one is kind of trending that way. My 10th Anniversary RRB BO. What a ride it has been!

Beer Boy Delivery BO 10

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And Quasi-Motobike, aka Pre-Pro Beer Delivery bike!

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More to come!
 
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