Please Help With Value And Year

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I bought this Western Flyer, Galaxy Flyer a few days ago for $5. Serial # U1252154. I appreciate any help with value and year.
 

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I have no idea about the year. There are others on here that can help.

In my opinion it is a great deal at $5. Placing a value really depends on what you mean. If you are trying to flip the bike for a profit, my opinion is that is a losing game. By the time you put new tires on and spend several hours tuning it up, you will have spent more than it is worth. Not just this bike, but virtually all antique bikes. Just not a big market for them.

If you want to learn how to fix bikes, or if you want to use the frame for a custom build, or want to make a daily rider , or want to join in a ratrod build off… well than this bike has enormous value.

Some bikes have collectible value. I’m not sure this does. I am often wrong though.
 
Your particular bike was made by Murray. The long pointy rear dropouts was a signature design for Murray cruisers. As early as 1962 to mid 1970s. They sold the same bike under many brand names and models to different retailers. They used different serial numbers systems for some retailers.

About 1979, the Spoke-a-Roo reflector was the topic of a drawn out patent claim and subsequent lawsuits. Most are so brittle they will surely break if you try to remove them. Best to unscrew the spoke and slide the spoke out the clips. The older ones are red or yellow. By the late 1970s, the CPSC mandated that all spoke reflectors in the USA be white. that reflector may have been added later on.

I remember those bikes being lined up in front of the Holiday gas stations. Also sold at Western Auto car parts stores. Surely sold under many other brand names as well. A different name for each retailer. Made by Murray, Columbia, AMF, etc for any company that wanted to sell bikes during the bike boom. Yours looks to be in pretty good condition. Fresh rubber may improve the ride some. Rock hard rubber won't ride well on any bike. The tire size would be the same as modern 26" bikes. BSD of 559. 26 x n.nn. (no fractional sizes will fit). I've ridden some with knobby tires, just awful. The rusty ones I see are better used as yard art planters in gardens.

The cantilever frame kinda looks like a Schwinn design but the build quality is really lacking. The basic frame construction method is to drill a hole in the bb or head tube and stick the frame tubes into that hole and tack-braze the joint. I've had two so far where the brass broke letting the tube slide out. Just isn't very sturdy. If you pedal hard on these frames, the bikes flex like crazy and you don't go any faster. The fork ends are just the fork blades smashed flat and slot cut in for the axle. The rear dropouts are rather thin mild steel and bend very easy. Often the thin spokes are loose so the wheels wobble. All the bearing cups are stamped sheet metal. They were about the cheapest bikes when new. $29.95 in 1962. About 1/2 the price of a Schwinn.
 
It’s got value as is or as a custom. I bet you could sell it for 100 as is. I love the Murray’s particularly for the devil tail drop outs. They are a little flimsy but fine for a cruiser. Cool find and great deal!
 
Nice middleweight bike (26 x 1.75" tires).

I believe that the SPCA did allow (and still allows) the amber and red reflectors on children's bicycle toys.

16 CFR 1512:
"Side reflectors. The side-mounted reflector devices shall be essentially colorless or amber on the front wheel and essentially colorless or red on the rear wheel".

State & local laws for riders may vary.
 
I have one. Someone gave it to me. I have a lot into repaint, new decals, new tires. It’s a nice looking bike but here it’s worth $40 max. There are a jillion used bikes everywhere. The tougher ones to find are the ones that survived both WWI and the WWII scrap drives. Most people can buy a new big box bike that is probably better, not because it’s better, it’s just newer. Under $200 new. A lot of people have the cheap repops cruisers here, way more than vintage.
 
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I have one. Someone gave it to me. I have a lot into repaint, new decals, new tires. It’s a nice looking bike but here it’s worth $40 max. There are a jillion used bikes everywhere. The tougher ones to find are the ones that survived both WWI and the WWII scrap drives. Most people can buy a new big box bike that is probably better, not because it’s better, it’s just newer. Under $200 new. A lot of people have the cheap repops cruisers here, way more than vintage.
Do you have a photo of yours?
 
As stated above, this is a classic but basic Murray lightweight. They made variations of this for many many many years, but I would guess yours to be early 80s (possibly late 70s). Good solid bike, but not really any collectible value to speak of. Just a solid cool bike. Realistically worth $40 to $100 on a good day depending on the local market.
 

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