Silver King Unchained: BELT DRIVE....What a ride~!

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OddJob

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I just realized that you can pretty much locate the BACK40 from this video! I was pointing the camera in the right direction across the CHS ball field, and then while watching the video on my bigger laptop screen, I realized you could see the St Paul Ski Club ski jump perched on top of the hill. It's only about a 1/4 mile from the BACK40 as the crow flies.

SKU in the Capitol BACK40.jpg



Our house is nearly the highest point in Ramsey County, so it makes sense that a ski jump that stands another 46 meters off the top of the highest hill around, would be seen from 5 miles away.

ski jump.jpg
 
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I am so very much enjoying the travels the past couple weeks .
I been playing Johnny cash song 'I been everywhere ' 🎵🎶. ..... 😁👍
 

kingfish254

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I just realized that you can pretty much locate the BACK40 from this video! I was pointing the camera in the right direction across the CHS ball field, and then while watching the video on my bigger laptop screen, I realized you could see the St Paul Ski Club ski jump perched on top of the hill. It's only about a 1/4 mile from the BACK40 as the crow flies.

View attachment 195679


Our house is nearly the highest point in Ramsey County, so it makes sense that a ski jump that stands another 46 meters off the top of the highest hill around, would be seen from 5 miles away.

View attachment 195685

We need to see an OddJob Evel Knievel jump from this some day!!!!
 

kingfish254

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Great to see you out and about riding SKU OJ!!! It's looking great. I love the way you used the Trek vintage belt drive parts on this one!
 

OddJob

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Great to see you out and about riding SKU OJ!!! It's looking great. I love the way you used the Trek vintage belt drive parts on this one!
Thanks, Royal Ichthus CCLIV ! It really did work out well using the Trek belt drive stuff. I am brainstorming on maybe 1 or 2 more 'mods' to the build, but so far so good.
 

OddJob

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I tell ya what, you sleep for a second on this build off and you slide right back on that slippery slope to Page 2 Slackerdom !

Had an interesting conversation about body positioning on a bike last night with a couple of our esteemed members here on RRB. I know we don't often talk a lot about the actual 'riding' of the bike in these build offs, but there are a few tips I have learned over the last 34 yrs of making happy customers through a good bicycle 'fit', that might be helpful here for those that ride their 'rolling art creations', aka Build Off bikes!

We talk here about the 'go' and the 'show' positions of our saddles. This discussion is mostly related to the 'go' position, but if you plan and scale your build you can have a decent 'show' position with these tips as well.

For those of us that are probably 5'10" and taller, we will never have a full leg extension on a vintage cruiser framed bicycle. But we can have a comfortable fit, and feel good riding the bike, even if we don't have the required leg extension for full power to the pedals. The frames simply weren't manufactured with tall people in mind, and the average height in 1950 is almost the same for today, 5'9" in the USA. Now those of you with Scandinavian ancestors will scoff at this, as the average height for those of us with that heritage is nearly 6' tall, 3" taller than the average American male. But size isn't what matters here, bicycle fit is. :grin:

During our conversation last night, I went out to the BACK40, grabbed my tape measure, and confirmed what I already knew to be true. The relative position of my saddle fore and aft, no matter what the height of the saddle was, in regard to my pedal position was nearly exactly the same on all my bikes in the stable. And, the distance from my center seated position to my hand position on the bars, was also nearly spot on. Even though my bikes aren't in a perfectly straight line here, for storage purposes, you can kind of get the idea.
286400983_1257487201725871_4841221018086317688_n.jpg


Those two factors, in that order, can make for a comfortable and fairly efficient pedaling position on the bike.
A common mistake is trying to adjust distance from the bars by altering saddle position – usually by moving it forward. Saddle should be positioned relative to the pedals, regardless of the bars position. For our purposes, because we use different types of saddles and saddle mounts, this measurement should be taken from the center of your seated position on the saddle, with your pedals at the 3 and 9 o'clock position. The plumb bob, a string or fish line with a heavy washer or nut on the end, held off the front of your knee cap, should line up with the pedal axle with the widest part of your foot over the axle. This photo shows it well.

Saddle fore and aft.jpg


Again, this measurement isn't relative to saddle height, but rather the fore and aft position of the saddle.
Only after the saddle is positioned correctly, the bar should be set in the desired position. Placing the bars closer and higher results in a more upright riding position and vice-versa – placing the bars further and/or lower, results in a more leaned position. As shown in this diagram, you can see the saddle to pedal position is the same, even though the upper body position changes.



handlebars position.jpg


Over the years I have found that every bike I have no matter if it's a laid back 'nanner equipped big boy muscle bike, a klunker build fit for off-road, or a vintage cruiser build; they all share the same saddle to pedal fit and within fractions of the same centered seated to hands on the bars distance fit.

If you are like me, the laid back seat post is a necessity to achieve this on our build off bikes using vintage frames. Thanks to Chad @ChopShopCustomz for all those seat posts that have made it possible! The only bike I don't have that fits well yet is my current build Silver King Unchained ! Because I had to use a quill style BACK40 Kustom post, I am still figuring on how to get it back about 2" for my optimal position.

RaT oN~!
 
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MattiThundrrr

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Thanks for sharing this, OddJob. Really important stuff to understand. I've never done the measurements with plumb bob or tried a real layback post, I just slam the seat as far back in the rails as I can.
 

OddJob

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Thanks for sharing this, OddJob. Really important stuff to understand. I've never done the measurements with plumb bob or tried a real layback post, I just slam the seat as far back in the rails as I can.
Give it a go, Matti. You will be satisfied with the results, I'm sure. It's all relative to the length of your femur bone in your upper leg. I have a long femur, which requires me to get my seated position back to make the 'saddle to pedal' fit work for me. Seat rails alone won't cut it for me, so the laid back post has been a necessity for vintage builds.
 

Captain Awesome

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Seat rails alone won't cut it for me, so the laid back post has been a necessity for vintage builds.

Ditto



Now those of you with Scandinavian ancestors will scoff at this, as the average height for those of us with that heritage is nearly 6' tall, 3" taller than the average American male


Checking in ✋
 
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At 5'-6" I find a layback seat post helpful too. It helps me keep the seat low enough I can touch the ground on tip toe with at least one foot and still stretch my legs out when pedaling. I like a big cockpit area which the layback helps with too. I can't stand riding a bike that has a short reach. Guess I am built a bit like an ape. My most comfy bike to ride is my Electra Townie with the 6" stretch between the seat tube and BB. I have noticed on all my other bikes the same thing as Mr Job, how close they all are in measurements.
 
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I tell ya what, you sleep for a second on this build off and you slide right back on that slippery slope to Page 2 Slackerdom !

Had an interesting conversation about body positioning on a bike last night with a couple of our esteemed members here on RRB. I know we don't often talk a lot about the actual 'riding' of the bike in these build offs, but there are a few tips I have learned over the last 34 yrs of making happy customers through a good bicycle 'fit', that might be helpful here for those that ride their 'rolling art creations', aka Build Off bikes!

We talk here about the 'go' and the 'show' positions of our saddles. This discussion is mostly related to the 'go' position, but if you plan and scale your build you can have a decent 'show' position with these tips as well.

For those of us that are probably 5'10" and taller, we will never have a full leg extension on a vintage cruiser framed bicycle. But we can have a comfortable fit, and feel good riding the bike, even if we don't have the required leg extension for full power to the pedals. The frames simply weren't manufactured with tall people in mind, and the average height in 1950 is almost the same for today, 5'9" in the USA. Now those of you with Scandinavian ancestors will scoff at this, as the average height for those of us with that heritage is nearly 6' tall, 3" taller than the average American male. But size isn't what matters here, bicycle fit is. :grin:

During our conversation last night, I went out to the BACK40, grabbed my tape measure, and confirmed what I already knew to be true. The relative position of my saddle fore and aft, no matter what the height of the saddle was, in regard to my pedal position was nearly exactly the same on all my bikes in the stable. And, the distance from my center seated position to my hand position on the bars, was also nearly spot on. Even though my bikes aren't in a perfectly straight line here, for storage purposes, you can kind of get the idea.
View attachment 196093

Those two factors, in that order, can make for a comfortable and fairly efficient pedaling position on the bike.
A common mistake is trying to adjust distance from the bars by altering saddle position – usually by moving it forward. Saddle should be positioned relative to the pedals, regardless of the bars position. For our purposes, because we use different types of saddles and saddle mounts, this measurement should be taken from the center of your seated position on the saddle, with your pedals at the 3 and 9 o'clock position. The plumb bob, a string or fish line with a heavy washer or nut on the end, held off the front of your knee cap, should line up with the pedal axle with the widest part of your foot over the axle. This photo shows it well.

View attachment 196094

Again, this measurement isn't relative to saddle height, but rather the fore and aft position of the saddle.
Only after the saddle is positioned correctly, the bar should be set in the desired position. Placing the bars closer and higher results in a more upright riding position and vice-versa – placing the bars further and/or lower, results in a more leaned position. As shown in this diagram, you can see the saddle to pedal position is the same, even though the upper body position changes.



View attachment 196095

Over the years I have found that every bike I have no matter if it's a laid back 'nanner equipped big boy muscle bike, a klunker build fit for off-road, or a vintage cruiser build; they all share the same saddle to pedal fit and within fractions of the same centered seated to hands on the bars distance fit.

If you are like me, the laid back seat post is a necessity to achieve this on our build off bikes using vintage frames. Thanks to Chad @ChopShopCustomz for all those seat posts that have made it possible! The only bike I don't have that fits well yet is my current build Silver King Unchained ! Because I had to use a quill style BACK40 Kustom post, I am still figuring on how to get it back about 2" for my optimal position.

RaT oN~!
Good ole Rats Gass. That was a great build!
 

JA331

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Thanks odd job. I’ll try it too. Being 6’2 I position the seat as far back as it will go and quite high. I’ve never tried a laid back post because I’m 215lbs and would probably need a solid one to take my weight. I find my 53 Roadmaster with the laid back seat mast has the geometry that suits me best of all my old bikes. I also have a bad neck and don’t like to lean forward.
C8FE290C-DADA-4017-9C82-16D9A341BB45.jpeg
 
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OddJob

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@JA331 , I am a solid 225. If you can get a solid laid back post from Chad you will love the positioning it provides. He may have some lying around, don't think they are in production anymore.

 

JA331

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I may try one on my build off bike. It has a 1"and i could get an engineer I know to bend me one from some 4130 hollow tubing. It would probably be strong enough. My older bikes like my roadmaster have a 5/8" post and a laid back one in that size would need to be solid. I made my own straight one from solid stainless bar and it has held up fine.
@JA331 , I am a solid 225. If you can get a solid laid back post from Chad you will love the positioning it provides. He may have some lying around, don't think they are in production anymore.

 

The Renaissance Man

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Great advice Lee. Maybe one day I will own a bike that is tailor fitted specifically for me. I've always wondered what that would be like. I've read about custom frame builders measuring clients like they were fitting them for a designer suit!


But until then, I usually just throw comfort out the window and opt for form over function. I liken it to women's shoes; they don't have to be comfortable, they just have to look good!

Here's an example of one that the riding position makes me look like a school kid going through an "Air Raid Drill" back in the 1950s and 60s! :21:
100_5735-jpg.82291

550a8288253219d340f83ee5950cd691.jpg
 

kingfish254

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@JA331 , I am a solid 225. If you can get a solid laid back post from Chad you will love the positioning it provides. He may have some lying around, don't think they are in production anymore.


Chad retired from bikes and bike part making last year or the year before. However, a fellow custom builder Joshua D, down in Texas recently started Chop Shop Customz (with Chad's approval). I don't think that website works anymore. The best way to contact Joshua is via the FB page.

 

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